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This document offers guidance to instructors who are teaching a Hybrid course, i.e., one with both on-campus students who signed up for in-classroom meetings and remote students who can only meet online.

Using a HyFlex approach (teaching in a classroom, simultaneously, to your in-classroom and remote students)

  1. Not all classrooms are suitable for Hyflex instruction. Using the guidance below, determine what equipment you will need for your classroom.
    • You want remote students to see/hear you lecturing: look for a "wireless microphone" and a "lectern-facing camera."
    • Also: consider pre-recording videos and using classroom time for discussion/Q&A/active learning.
    • You want remote students to see your handwriting and hear you:  look for a "document camera" or "SMART Podium."
    • You want remote students to see/hear a classroom discussion: look for an "audience-facing camera" Tip: Use the classroom computer/projector to display your remote students on Zoom.

  2. Check in Banner to see what classroom you are in.

  3. Check on the LTS Classroom Site to see what technology is in your classroom.

  4. If your classroom does NOT have the technology you need, submit a request to LTS asking that the equipment be added to your classroom.

  5. Prepare yourself for teaching in the HyFlex classroom
    The biggest challenge is keeping the experience equitable for in-classroom and remote students. Always double check that remote students are connected and are seeing and hearing what they are supposed to see and hear. It is important to  call on remote students, engage them in activities, connect them to in-classroom students. In-classroom students can take turns playing a role monitoring Zoom or chat for questions.
  6. Ask for Help
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<!-- During Fall 2020 you may be teaching a course with both on-campus students and remote students. There are several approaches to how you use your face-to-face time in the classroom described below.





This page is supplemental to the "Preparing To Teach in Fall 2020" and "Preparing to Teach a Blended, Hybrid or Fully Online Course" sites.

Hybrid Teaching: Strategies for Instructors with both In-classroom and Remote Students

This document offers guidance to instructors who are teaching a Hybrid course, i.e., one with both on-campus students who signed up for in-classroom meetings and remote students who can only meet online.




Recommended Learning Framework for Hybrid Classes

The Provost has strongly advised all instructors to adopt Lehigh’s blended learning framework, which recommends using both asynchronous and synchronous instructional approaches for all Fall 2020 classes, including Hybrid classes.




Find out your students’ plans by surveying them as soon as possible.

How to find your class roster
Technical advice on using Google forms to survey your students

Recommended questions:

Are you planning to attend our class meetings in-person or remotely (in Zoom)?
If you are taking the course remotely, how many hours are you ahead of or behind GMT? (If you aren’t sure, Google "timezone" and the name of your nearest city. Pennsylvania is "GMT-4". China is  "GMT+8."  Madrid is "GMT +1").




Select an Instructional Approach




OPTION 1: Split the class into groups--where at least one group is for remote students--and meet with the groups on an alternating pattern.

  Some examples:

-Meet one day a week in-classroom exclusively with in-classroom students; one-day a week in Zoom exclusively with remote students; and perhaps a third in Zoom with all students *

-Any class with few remote students: meet with on-campus students during regularly scheduled class times; add at least one weekly synchronous meeting exclusively for remote students.*

-Any class with few in-person students: meet with all students in Zoom during regularly scheduled class times; add at least one weekly in-person meeting exclusively for in-person students.*

* All of these approaches assume you are making up for lost synchronous meetings by adding asynchronous modules as described in the blended learning framework.

IMPORTANT: If you are adopting this approach and do NOT need special in-classroom technology to support a HyFlex approach (described below), please email Carol Bene in RAS (cbe205) asap to let her know you do not need a room that supports Zoom meetings...or may not need a classroom at all.

-Optional Reading: InsideHigherEd's, "Can Active Learning Co-Exist With Physically Distanced Classrooms?" (Doug Lederman) -->



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