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Session 1 - Wednesday, 22 Jan

Before class

  • Buy (borrow, rent) a copy of the textbook
  • If you can, check out the course resources linked from the main course page: this wiki, the bookmarks list, the Moodle site.

During class (ppt)

  • Introductions
  • Tour of course sites, resources
    • Textbook
    • Public face of the course: Wiki
      • Intended curriculum: Map
      • Enacted curriculum: Record, built session-by-session. See previous version of this course for an example.
    • Private face of the course: CourseSite.
      • You're probably familiar with Blackboard; we'll be using a different courseware system called Moodle. Lehigh has named theirs CourseSite.
      • Note that Moodle is a free tool. If you're interested, you can set up your own Moodle and use if for teaching your classes--an example is here.
    • Course bookmarks--some websites that you may find useful during the semester.
    • And in case you don't have one already in front of you: classroom laptops
  • Reviewing syllabus
    • Part 1: General overview, expectations
    • Part 2: Assignments
  • Conceptual work:
    • What is social studies? (via Jigsaw(-ish) activity)
      • Individual work for 10 minutes
      • Report out: Describe what you looked at, what you discussed. Instructor will make a list.
      • Consider: Different lenses, overlapping lenses to social studies
  • Instruction presentation: What is social studies? A natural evolution in education? A historical oddity? An ill-defined object? A battlefield?
  • What is a social studies methods course?
    • Content? Techniques? Lesson planning?
    • Significance of model lessons: LGL / Jigsaw, Hilda Taba
  • Why does social studies matter?
  • What does social studies need to look like in the 21st century? Example of shifting needs: Civil Rights Movement: Should we focus on Claudette Colvin and not just Rosa Parks? Should we draw attention to Bayard Rustin? Is Fannie Lou Hamer the hinge between social and political revolution? Or should we look at Emmett Till and juxtapose him with Tamir Rice?
  • Closure: Discussion of WTL, original instructional materials assignments

After class

  • Reading
    • Chapin, Ch. 1
    • C3 Framework: intro material & history section
    • PDE standards for history
    • Common Core (well, "PA Core") standards for reading & writing in "History and Social Studies"
    • NCSS, 2008. In fact, the whole list of NCSS position statements is probably worth bookmarking!
    • Optional: Mehlinger, 1988; Crocco, 2004
  • Assignments
    • Download and organize relevant standards: C3 Framework, PDE standards on history, geography, civics, & economics, etc.
    • WTL (start your thread in the CourseSite): Take 20 minutes to ... write the history of the world. Seriously. Just give it your best effort. See what's in the ol' memory bank. Then take a look at and comment on a classmate's work.
    • Update your profile in CourseSite to include your picture
    • Complete your first original instructional material and bring it to class next week. Don't forget to include a paragraph explaining its intended use. 
    • Start lining up an HTCE participant


Session 2 - Wednesday, 29 Jan

Before class

  • Complete and bring in your OIP #1
  • Complete readings
  • Download and file the standards; read the history standards
  • Complete WTL

During class (ppt)

After class


Session 3 - Wednesday, 5 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in HTCE prep work. It might help to read Barton & Levstik, 1996 before you do this.
  • Complete WTL
  • Complete reading


During class (ppt)

  • I need your help conducting an experiment: I want to start using Google Assignment, so let's get into CourseSite and see if we can make it work.
  • Conceptual work
    • More playing with primary sources: King Phillip's War
    • Digging into the research base
      • Work of Sam Wineburg
      • Work of Barton & Levstik
  • Closure


After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook: Chapin, Ch. 3 & 4
    • Barton & Levstik, 2003 (challenges of sourcework)
    • Optional: Wineburg, 1991 (sourcework)
    • Optional: Hicks, Doolittle & Ewing, 2004
    • Optional: Lee & Clark, 2004 (digital history, SCIM-C)
    • Gross-Loh, 2016 (article from The Atlantic) on a history class at Harvard – lots of great, quick exposure to issues in history ed, some good thoughts on methods
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in OIP #2, don’t forget to include *reflection*
    • WTL on history methods & dispositions


Session 4 - Wednesday, 12 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in your OIP #2; don't forget the reflection! See syllabus for details
  • WTL
  • Complete reading

During class (ppt on instructional planningppt on history ed)

  • OIP #2 brief sharing
  • Assignments: Next up is course plan. How to approach it.
  • Some work on instructional planning
  • More history ed
    • Pivoting towards a civic-oriented stance w/Wikipedia
    • Going bonkers with Wikipedia: Wikipedia as applied epistemology? Something no disciplinarian can resist?
    • More civics-oriented suggestions
      • Contemporary parallels?
      • Local relevance?
      • "So what?" strategy
      • The "Secret History" strategy, or (more appropriately) including under-privileged voices
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook, Ch. 2 (planning)
    • "What is an Essential Question?"
    • At least take a brief dip into the folder of materials from Virginia. Look at the standards document first (SOLs), then the framework document. Notice how the standards have been re-framed into the concepts from Wiggins & McTighe / Backwards Design (essential understandings, essential questions, essential knowledge, etc.). It's not all super-awesome, but it's definitely a more useful document than anything you'll find at the state level in Pennsylvania. Finally, look at the scope-and-sequence document – pretty dry, and I'd hate to see someone implement it as-if, but again – it's a good starting point. 
    • Hammond, 2010: I'm generally reluctant to assign my own stuff, but this does directly speak to the issue of civics integration in history ed...and in a (relatively) explicit/direct way. Why I'm making an exception: This study highlights the 'So what?' approach to integrating civics themes into history instruction, plus it illustrates the Virginia instructional regimen. Unfortunately, I can't link you to the actual student work anymore...the website has gone defunct....
  • Assignments
    • Complete course plan  #1.
      • Take a look at the course catalog from Liberty High School (or another school, preferably one in Pennsylvania) and pick out a class that you would LOVE to teach. 
      • Don't forget to check the syllabus for the requirements, and don't forget the reflection component.
      • And feel free to look at my (partial) sample course plan (linked in CourseSite) to give you a sense of the grain-size on this assignment. This is a VERY exploratory assignment – you're walking around in the space, you're sketching out trial balloons....
    • If you didn't already: Do WTL plugging your OIP work into a Backwards Design framework



Session 5 - Wednesday, 19 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in your first course plan
  • WTL
  • Complete reading

During class

  • Opening up civics ed
    • Connections between civics and history
    • Civics as a "high-stakes" content area:
    • Opening salvos on content, methods
      • Analyzing visual images about the branches of government
      • Mock elections, mock polling
      • Draw the Lines PA
  • What makes civics special?

After class

  • Reading
    • Civics standards: PDE, C3 – read and mark up!
    • Chapin, Ch. 7 (Civic Education and Global Education)
    • Optional: Fallace, 2010 (written for professors, not students, but this is the origin / parallel-thinking of the three stances framework)
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in first installment of Fieldwork (just a short statement)
    • Complete WTL in CourseSite

Session 6 - Wednesday, 25 Feb

Before class

  • Complete reading. Please *DO* mark up the civics standards. This is a bigger deal than usual!!
  • Complete WTL
  • Turn in update on your fieldwork

During class (ppt)

After class

  • Reading
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in Course Plan #2
    • Start thinking about microteaching! When you want to do it, what you want to teach


Session 7 - Wednesday, 4 Mar

Before class

  • Complete and turn in Course Plan #2
  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

After class

  • Reading
    • Hammond & Manfra, 2009 (at long last!)
  • Assignments
    • WTL: Civics ed, give three lesson ideas (one G, one P, one M) on a topic
    • Complete and turn in your CURRICULUM MAP – see templates, sample in CourseSite!


Session 8 - Wednesday, 18 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Do microteaching sign-up
  • Complete WTL
  • Complete and turn in your curriculum map

During class (ppt)

  • Current events: Citizen heroes for our time? Bioethics Lessons From Three of the Early Heroes of Coronavirus Pandemic
  • Conceptual work: Assessment & social studies
    • Generic purposes & assumptions of assessment: sequestered, individual tasks; assessment OF learning vs. assessment FOR learning; accountability / the 'bottom line' vs. the challenges of failure (or being passed along)
    • Reviewing things you (may?) already know – formative v. summative, etc.
    • Assessment in the context of social studies: What's the bottom line, again? Significance of schema, level of non-information in traditional assessments.
    • Examination of the work of Sam Wineburg, Gabriel Reich. Test items as text: compare primary source heuristics & test-wiseness
    • Examples of non-traditional assessment: Quick look back at example of a digital documentary. (This was made using PrimaryAccess.) Other tools: Glogster, Prezi, good ol' powerpoint (albeit perhaps used non-traditionally), a discussion board, etc. 
      • Essay group
        • Start with the Free Response Question. Individually examine the question and the images, then individually outline an answer. Then read the sample student response and score it with a rubric. Discuss your scoring. 
        • Move to the Document-Based Question. Examine the question and the documents, but skip writing your own answer. Examine the rubric, then look at the sample student response. Score it individually, then discuss.  
      • Collaborative test-taking group
        • Answer the first ten questions on your own. 
        • Answer the second ten questions on your own; then stop and discuss them. Note places where you changed your answers and provide an explanation of why. 
        • Answer the last ten questions on your own. Then use a computer to explore these questions further. Change your answers as needed, and document your changes (i.e., provide new answer, explain your new understanding, and provide links to relevant sites)  
    • Assessment resources

      • PDE SAS section on Project-Based Assessment (used to be labeled "Fair Assessment"). None of these are for social studies, but check out the ones on Literature. The "Follow, Follow, Follow" assessment has a particular resonance for today....
      • NAEP Questions Toolkit  – all of the "Big Four" social studies disciplines get their own assessments! Grades 4, 8, and 12
        • NAEP reports, if you want to see how these things have played out over time – for example, how did students fare on the 2010 vs. 2014 assessments? 
      • Example of publisher items.
  • Closure: Don't forget that you will be assessed, too! Taking a look at the Praxis.

After class 

  • Reading: Chapin, Ch. 5; Reich, 2009
  • Review NAEP & Praxis links (above)
  • Work on remaining assignments! HTCE, unit (recognizing that you can only tackle the first step at this point)


Session 9 - Wednesday, 25 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Preview the instructional unit assignment

During class (ppt)

  • Re-visiting assessment...and I want to discuss that Reich, 2009 article a bit...
  • Talking about the instructional unit...which necessitates talking about writing objectives
  • Getting into geography education. Here are a few links that will be handy
    • I'll be referencing my "What's in a (State) Name?" activity – see it halfway down this page on computational thinking.  
    • Time permitting, I'll also be referencing a ppt that's in CourseSite, 'families and food.ppt'. Since it involves copyrighted images, I'm not putting it out here on the wiki. I'm taking materials from this book
    • If you like, download and install Google Earth: https://www.google.com/earth/  --note that it can also run via a browser, but I think the client-side version gives you more options
    • Lehigh's ArcGIS Online server: https://lu.maps.arcgis.com/home/index.html --we'll be doing an activity in here.


After class

  • More geography activities!
    • Sketchmaps: Pick TWO of the following and make a sketchmap – no more than 5 minutes each
      • Map of Mountaintop campus
      • Map of Southside Bethlehem
      • Map of the Lehigh Valley
      • Map of the United States
      • Map of the world
    • Types of maps – I posted a page of links; please explore each and identify what type of map you're seeing in each set. We will discuss at our next class meeting
    • Map projections – read this page that I created for TLT 368
  • Reading
    • Chapin, Ch. 8
    • Materials about writing objectives (see CourseSite for today's session)
    • optional: Alibrandi & Sarnoff, 2006 – I found this very influential in my thinking about what could/should be done with geospatial tools in a social studies class
  • Assignment: Complete and turn in unit overview

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 ...end

Session 1 - Wednesday, 22 Jan

Before class

  • Buy (borrow, rent) a copy of the textbook
  • If you can, check out the course resources linked from the main course page: this wiki, the bookmarks list, the Moodle site.

During class (ppt)

  • Introductions
  • Tour of course sites, resources
    • Textbook
    • Public face of the course: Wiki
      • Intended curriculum: Map
      • Enacted curriculum: Record, built session-by-session. See previous version of this course for an example.
    • Private face of the course: CourseSite.
      • You're probably familiar with Blackboard; we'll be using a different courseware system called Moodle. Lehigh has named theirs CourseSite.
      • Note that Moodle is a free tool. If you're interested, you can set up your own Moodle and use if for teaching your classes--an example is here.
    • Course bookmarks--some websites that you may find useful during the semester.
    • And in case you don't have one already in front of you: classroom laptops
  • Reviewing syllabus
    • Part 1: General overview, expectations
    • Part 2: Assignments
  • Conceptual work:
    • What is social studies? (via Jigsaw(-ish) activity)
      • Individual work for 10 minutes
      • Report out: Describe what you looked at, what you discussed. Instructor will make a list.
      • Consider: Different lenses, overlapping lenses to social studies
  • Instruction presentation: What is social studies? A natural evolution in education? A historical oddity? An ill-defined object? A battlefield?
  • What is a social studies methods course?
    • Content? Techniques? Lesson planning?
    • Significance of model lessons: LGL / Jigsaw, Hilda Taba
  • Why does social studies matter?
  • What does social studies need to look like in the 21st century? Example of shifting needs: Civil Rights Movement: Should we focus on Claudette Colvin and not just Rosa Parks? Should we draw attention to Bayard Rustin? Is Fannie Lou Hamer the hinge between social and political revolution? Or should we look at Emmett Till and juxtapose him with Tamir Rice?
  • Closure: Discussion of WTL, original instructional materials assignments

After class

  • Reading
    • Chapin, Ch. 1
    • C3 Framework: intro material & history section
    • PDE standards for history
    • Common Core (well, "PA Core") standards for reading & writing in "History and Social Studies"
    • NCSS, 2008. In fact, the whole list of NCSS position statements is probably worth bookmarking!
    • Optional: Mehlinger, 1988; Crocco, 2004
  • Assignments
    • Download and organize relevant standards: C3 Framework, PDE standards on history, geography, civics, & economics, etc.
    • WTL (start your thread in the CourseSite): Take 20 minutes to ... write the history of the world. Seriously. Just give it your best effort. See what's in the ol' memory bank. Then take a look at and comment on a classmate's work.
    • Update your profile in CourseSite to include your picture
    • Complete your first original instructional material and bring it to class next week. Don't forget to include a paragraph explaining its intended use. 
    • Start lining up an HTCE participant


Session 2 - Wednesday, 29 Jan

Before class

  • Complete and bring in your OIP #1
  • Complete readings
  • Download and file the standards; read the history standards
  • Complete WTL

During class (ppt)

After class


Session 3 - Wednesday, 5 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in HTCE prep work. It might help to read Barton & Levstik, 1996 before you do this.
  • Complete WTL
  • Complete reading


During class (ppt)

  • I need your help conducting an experiment: I want to start using Google Assignment, so let's get into CourseSite and see if we can make it work.
  • Conceptual work
    • More playing with primary sources: King Phillip's War
    • Digging into the research base
      • Work of Sam Wineburg
      • Work of Barton & Levstik
  • Closure


After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook: Chapin, Ch. 3 & 4
    • Barton & Levstik, 2003 (challenges of sourcework)
    • Optional: Wineburg, 1991 (sourcework)
    • Optional: Hicks, Doolittle & Ewing, 2004
    • Optional: Lee & Clark, 2004 (digital history, SCIM-C)
    • Gross-Loh, 2016 (article from The Atlantic) on a history class at Harvard – lots of great, quick exposure to issues in history ed, some good thoughts on methods
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in OIP #2, don’t forget to include *reflection*
    • WTL on history methods & dispositions


Session 4 - Wednesday, 12 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in your OIP #2; don't forget the reflection! See syllabus for details
  • WTL
  • Complete reading

During class (ppt on instructional planningppt on history ed)

  • OIP #2 brief sharing
  • Assignments: Next up is course plan. How to approach it.
  • Some work on instructional planning
  • More history ed
    • Pivoting towards a civic-oriented stance w/Wikipedia
    • Going bonkers with Wikipedia: Wikipedia as applied epistemology? Something no disciplinarian can resist?
    • More civics-oriented suggestions
      • Contemporary parallels?
      • Local relevance?
      • "So what?" strategy
      • The "Secret History" strategy, or (more appropriately) including under-privileged voices
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook, Ch. 2 (planning)
    • "What is an Essential Question?"
    • At least take a brief dip into the folder of materials from Virginia. Look at the standards document first (SOLs), then the framework document. Notice how the standards have been re-framed into the concepts from Wiggins & McTighe / Backwards Design (essential understandings, essential questions, essential knowledge, etc.). It's not all super-awesome, but it's definitely a more useful document than anything you'll find at the state level in Pennsylvania. Finally, look at the scope-and-sequence document – pretty dry, and I'd hate to see someone implement it as-if, but again – it's a good starting point. 
    • Hammond, 2010: I'm generally reluctant to assign my own stuff, but this does directly speak to the issue of civics integration in history ed...and in a (relatively) explicit/direct way. Why I'm making an exception: This study highlights the 'So what?' approach to integrating civics themes into history instruction, plus it illustrates the Virginia instructional regimen. Unfortunately, I can't link you to the actual student work anymore...the website has gone defunct....
  • Assignments
    • Complete course plan  #1.
      • Take a look at the course catalog from Liberty High School (or another school, preferably one in Pennsylvania) and pick out a class that you would LOVE to teach. 
      • Don't forget to check the syllabus for the requirements, and don't forget the reflection component.
      • And feel free to look at my (partial) sample course plan (linked in CourseSite) to give you a sense of the grain-size on this assignment. This is a VERY exploratory assignment – you're walking around in the space, you're sketching out trial balloons....
    • If you didn't already: Do WTL plugging your OIP work into a Backwards Design framework



Session 5 - Wednesday, 19 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in your first course plan
  • WTL
  • Complete reading

During class

  • Opening up civics ed
    • Connections between civics and history
    • Civics as a "high-stakes" content area:
    • Opening salvos on content, methods
      • Analyzing visual images about the branches of government
      • Mock elections, mock polling
      • Draw the Lines PA
  • What makes civics special?

After class

  • Reading
    • Civics standards: PDE, C3 – read and mark up!
    • Chapin, Ch. 7 (Civic Education and Global Education)
    • Optional: Fallace, 2010 (written for professors, not students, but this is the origin / parallel-thinking of the three stances framework)
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in first installment of Fieldwork (just a short statement)
    • Complete WTL in CourseSite

Session 6 - Wednesday, 25 Feb

Before class

  • Complete reading. Please *DO* mark up the civics standards. This is a bigger deal than usual!!
  • Complete WTL
  • Turn in update on your fieldwork

During class (ppt)

After class

  • Reading
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in Course Plan #2
    • Start thinking about microteaching! When you want to do it, what you want to teach


Session 7 - Wednesday, 4 Mar

Before class

  • Complete and turn in Course Plan #2
  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

After class

  • Reading
    • Hammond & Manfra, 2009 (at long last!)
  • Assignments
    • WTL: Civics ed, give three lesson ideas (one G, one P, one M) on a topic
    • Complete and turn in your CURRICULUM MAP – see templates, sample in CourseSite!


Session 8 - Wednesday, 18 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Do microteaching sign-up
  • Complete WTL
  • Complete and turn in your curriculum map

During class (ppt)

  • Current events: Citizen heroes for our time? Bioethics Lessons From Three of the Early Heroes of Coronavirus Pandemic
  • Conceptual work: Assessment & social studies
    • Generic purposes & assumptions of assessment: sequestered, individual tasks; assessment OF learning vs. assessment FOR learning; accountability / the 'bottom line' vs. the challenges of failure (or being passed along)
    • Reviewing things you (may?) already know – formative v. summative, etc.
    • Assessment in the context of social studies: What's the bottom line, again? Significance of schema, level of non-information in traditional assessments.
    • Examination of the work of Sam Wineburg, Gabriel Reich. Test items as text: compare primary source heuristics & test-wiseness
    • Examples of non-traditional assessment: Quick look back at example of a digital documentary. (This was made using PrimaryAccess.) Other tools: Glogster, Prezi, good ol' powerpoint (albeit perhaps used non-traditionally), a discussion board, etc. 
      • Essay group
        • Start with the Free Response Question. Individually examine the question and the images, then individually outline an answer. Then read the sample student response and score it with a rubric. Discuss your scoring. 
        • Move to the Document-Based Question. Examine the question and the documents, but skip writing your own answer. Examine the rubric, then look at the sample student response. Score it individually, then discuss.  
      • Collaborative test-taking group
        • Answer the first ten questions on your own. 
        • Answer the second ten questions on your own; then stop and discuss them. Note places where you changed your answers and provide an explanation of why. 
        • Answer the last ten questions on your own. Then use a computer to explore these questions further. Change your answers as needed, and document your changes (i.e., provide new answer, explain your new understanding, and provide links to relevant sites)  
    • Assessment resources

      • PDE SAS section on Project-Based Assessment (used to be labeled "Fair Assessment"). None of these are for social studies, but check out the ones on Literature. The "Follow, Follow, Follow" assessment has a particular resonance for today....
      • NAEP Questions Toolkit  – all of the "Big Four" social studies disciplines get their own assessments! Grades 4, 8, and 12
        • NAEP reports, if you want to see how these things have played out over time – for example, how did students fare on the 2010 vs. 2014 assessments? 
      • Example of publisher items.
  • Closure: Don't forget that you will be assessed, too! Taking a look at the Praxis.

After class 

  • Reading: Chapin, Ch. 5; Reich, 2009
  • Review NAEP & Praxis links (above)
  • Work on remaining assignments! HTCE, unit (recognizing that you can only tackle the first step at this point)


Session 9 - Wednesday, 25 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Preview the instructional unit assignment

During class (ppt)

  • Re-visiting assessment...and I want to discuss that Reich, 2009 article a bit...
  • Talking about the instructional unit...which necessitates talking about writing objectives
  • Getting into geography education. Here are a few links that will be handy
    • I'll be referencing my "What's in a (State) Name?" activity – see it halfway down this page on computational thinking.  
    • Time permitting, I'll also be referencing a ppt that's in CourseSite, 'families and food.ppt'. Since it involves copyrighted images, I'm not putting it out here on the wiki. I'm taking materials from this book
    • If you like, download and install Google Earth: https://www.google.com/earth/  --note that it can also run via a browser, but I think the client-side version gives you more options
    • Lehigh's ArcGIS Online server: https://lu.maps.arcgis.com/home/index.html --we'll be doing an activity in here.


After class

  • More geography activities!
    • Make something in Lehigh's ArcGIS Online account.
    • Sketchmaps: Pick TWO of the following and make a sketchmap – no more than 5 minutes each
      • Map of Mountaintop campus
      • Map of Southside Bethlehem
      • Map of the Lehigh Valley
      • Map of the United States
      • Map of the world
    • Types of maps – I posted a page of links; please explore each and identify what type of map you're seeing in each set. We will discuss at our next class meeting
    • Map projections – read this page that I created for TLT 368
  • Reading
    • Chapin, Ch. 8
    • Materials about writing objectives (see CourseSite for today's session)
    • optional: Alibrandi & Sarnoff, 2006 – I found this very influential in my thinking about what could/should be done with geospatial tools in a social studies class
  • Assignment: Complete and turn in unit overview


Session 10 - Wednesday, 1 Apr

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Complete and turn in unit overview – see syllabus for details
  • Complete geography ed activities posted to in last week's record (above)

During class

  • Geography ed: Review of stances
  • Geography ed: Discussing independent activities from last week's follow-up
    • ArcGIS work
    • Types of maps
    • Map projections – why is this important? What stance does it fit into?
    • Sketchmaps – why is this useful? Again, what stance does it fit into?
  • More conceptual framing for geography ed: Geography is different because...
  • Geography ed resources, standards
    • This is something different: Five Themes of Geography
  • Fun things that we can't do properly
    • Geography ed + social media --> Population density enactive
    • Scaffolded geocache
    • Community needs activity
  • One thing that IS built for online work: Walking to Water activity

After class

  • Extension activities
    • Social media: Find three social media artifacts that you might use to teach geography. Try Flickr, YouTube, Instagram – I'm not picky
    • Scaffolded geocache
      • Download and install this app on your phone: My GPS Coordinates (Android, iOS)
      • Go outside and start the app.
      • Figure out which way is north; take ten big steps. Which way did your latitude change? Why?
      • Take ten big steps to the east. Which way did your longitude change? Why?
      • If you are really committed to this bit, get some sidewalk chalk and draw out a compass rose. Include the coordinates. Then go find a target and note its its coordinates. Get a friend or family member to start at the compass rose with you and then go locate the target, using the coordinates.
    • Community needs activity: Grab your phone and go outside. See if you can document one or more resources within walking distance of your house for meeting the following community needs
      • Shelter
      • Food
      • Water
      • Transportation
      • Communication
      • Sanitation & hygiene
      • Governance
      • Spirituality
      • Safety
      • Medical care
      • Education
      • Recreation & leisure
  • Reading
    • Geography standards: PDE, C3 (see CourseSite folder)
    • If you liked the scaffolded geocache: Hammond, Bodzin, & Stanlick, 2014
    • If you liked the community needs activity: Zoning & Built Environment manuscript
    • If you liked the Walking to Water activity...do you want to write an article about it? Would be happy to help. (BTW, I also need to write a manuscript about the school districts & diversity activity)



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