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Session 1 - Wednesday, 22 Jan

Before class

  • Buy (borrow, rent) a copy of the textbook
  • If you can, check out the course resources linked from the main course page: this wiki, the bookmarks list, the Moodle site.

During class (ppt)

  • Introductions
  • Tour of course sites, resources
    • Textbook
    • Public face of the course: Wiki
      • Intended curriculum: Map
      • Enacted curriculum: Record, built session-by-session. See previous version of this course for an example.
    • Private face of the course: CourseSite.
      • You're probably familiar with Blackboard; we'll be using a different courseware system called Moodle. Lehigh has named theirs CourseSite.
      • Note that Moodle is a free tool. If you're interested, you can set up your own Moodle and use if for teaching your classes--an example is here.
    • Course bookmarks--some websites that you may find useful during the semester.
    • And in case you don't have one already in front of you: classroom laptops
  • Reviewing syllabus
    • Part 1: General overview, expectations
    • Part 2: Assignments
  • Conceptual work:
    • What is social studies? (via Jigsaw(-ish) activity)
      • Individual work for 10 minutes
      • Report out: Describe what you looked at, what you discussed. Instructor will make a list.
      • Consider: Different lenses, overlapping lenses to social studies
  • Instruction presentation: What is social studies? A natural evolution in education? A historical oddity? An ill-defined object? A battlefield?
  • What is a social studies methods course?
    • Content? Techniques? Lesson planning?
    • Significance of model lessons: LGL / Jigsaw, Hilda Taba
  • Why does social studies matter?
  • What does social studies need to look like in the 21st century? Example of shifting needs: Civil Rights Movement: Should we focus on Claudette Colvin and not just Rosa Parks? Should we draw attention to Bayard Rustin? Is Fannie Lou Hamer the hinge between social and political revolution? Or should we look at Emmett Till and juxtapose him with Tamir Rice?
  • Closure: Discussion of WTL, original instructional materials assignments

After class

  • Reading
    • Chapin, Ch. 1
    • C3 Framework: intro material & history section
    • PDE standards for history
    • Common Core (well, "PA Core") standards for reading & writing in "History and Social Studies"
    • NCSS, 2008. In fact, the whole list of NCSS position statements is probably worth bookmarking!
    • Optional: Mehlinger, 1988; Crocco, 2004
  • Assignments
    • Download and organize relevant standards: C3 Framework, PDE standards on history, geography, civics, & economics, etc.
    • WTL (start your thread in the CourseSite): Take 20 minutes to ... write the history of the world. Seriously. Just give it your best effort. See what's in the ol' memory bank. Then take a look at and comment on a classmate's work.
    • Update your profile in CourseSite to include your picture
    • Complete your first original instructional material and bring it to class next week. Don't forget to include a paragraph explaining its intended use. 
    • Start lining up an HTCE participant


Session 2 - Wednesday, 29 Jan

Before class

  • Complete and bring in your OIP #1
  • Complete readings
  • Download and file the standards; read the history standards
  • Complete WTL

During class (ppt)

After class


Session 3 - Wednesday, 5 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in HTCE prep work. It might help to read Barton & Levstik, 1996 before you do this.
  • Complete WTL
  • Complete reading


During class (ppt)

  • I need your help conducting an experiment: I want to start using Google Assignment, so let's get into CourseSite and see if we can make it work.
  • Conceptual work
    • More playing with primary sources: King Phillip's War
    • Digging into the research base
      • Work of Sam Wineburg
      • Work of Barton & Levstik
  • Closure


After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook: Chapin, Ch. 3 & 4
    • Barton & Levstik, 2003 (challenges of sourcework)
    • Optional: Wineburg, 1991 (sourcework)
    • Optional: Hicks, Doolittle & Ewing, 2004
    • Optional: Lee & Clark, 2004 (digital history, SCIM-C)
    • Gross-Loh, 2016 (article from The Atlantic) on a history class at Harvard – lots of great, quick exposure to issues in history ed, some good thoughts on methods
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in OIP #2, don’t forget to include *reflection*
    • WTL on history methods & dispositions


Session 4 - Wednesday, 12 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in your OIP #2; don't forget the reflection! See syllabus for details
  • WTL
  • Complete reading

During class (ppt on instructional planningppt on history ed)

  • OIP #2 brief sharing
  • Assignments: Next up is course plan. How to approach it.
  • Some work on instructional planning
  • More history ed
    • Pivoting towards a civic-oriented stance w/Wikipedia
    • Going bonkers with Wikipedia: Wikipedia as applied epistemology? Something no disciplinarian can resist?
    • More civics-oriented suggestions
      • Contemporary parallels?
      • Local relevance?
      • "So what?" strategy
      • The "Secret History" strategy, or (more appropriately) including under-privileged voices
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook, Ch. 2 (planning)
    • "What is an Essential Question?"
    • At least take a brief dip into the folder of materials from Virginia. Look at the standards document first (SOLs), then the framework document. Notice how the standards have been re-framed into the concepts from Wiggins & McTighe / Backwards Design (essential understandings, essential questions, essential knowledge, etc.). It's not all super-awesome, but it's definitely a more useful document than anything you'll find at the state level in Pennsylvania. Finally, look at the scope-and-sequence document – pretty dry, and I'd hate to see someone implement it as-if, but again – it's a good starting point. 
    • Hammond, 2010: I'm generally reluctant to assign my own stuff, but this does directly speak to the issue of civics integration in history ed...and in a (relatively) explicit/direct way. Why I'm making an exception: This study highlights the 'So what?' approach to integrating civics themes into history instruction, plus it illustrates the Virginia instructional regimen. Unfortunately, I can't link you to the actual student work anymore...the website has gone defunct....
  • Assignments
    • Complete course plan  #1.
      • Take a look at the course catalog from Liberty High School (or another school, preferably one in Pennsylvania) and pick out a class that you would LOVE to teach. 
      • Don't forget to check the syllabus for the requirements, and don't forget the reflection component.
      • And feel free to look at my (partial) sample course plan (linked in CourseSite) to give you a sense of the grain-size on this assignment. This is a VERY exploratory assignment – you're walking around in the space, you're sketching out trial balloons....
    • If you didn't already: Do WTL plugging your OIP work into a Backwards Design framework



Session 5 - Wednesday, 19 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in your first course plan
  • WTL
  • Complete reading

During class

  • Opening up civics ed
    • Connections between civics and history
    • Civics as a "high-stakes" content area:
    • Opening salvos on content, methods
      • Analyzing visual images about the branches of government
      • Mock elections, mock polling
      • Draw the Lines PA
  • What makes civics special?

After class

  • Reading
    • Civics standards: PDE, C3 – read and mark up!
    • Chapin, Ch. 7 (Civic Education and Global Education)
    • Optional: Fallace, 2010 (written for professors, not students, but this is the origin / parallel-thinking of the three stances framework)
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in first installment of Fieldwork (just a short statement)
    • Complete WTL in CourseSite
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