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Session 1 - Wednesday, 27 Jan

Before class

  • Buy (borrow, rent) a copy of the textbook
  • If you can, check out the course resources linked from the main course page: this wiki, the bookmarks list, the Moodle site.

During class (ppt)

  • Introductions
  • Tour of course sites, resources
    • Textbook
    • Public face of the course: Wiki
      • Intended curriculum: Map
      • Enacted curriculum: Record, built session-by-session. See previous version of this course for an example.
    • Private face of the course: CourseSite.
      • You're probably familiar with Blackboard; we'll be using a different courseware system called Moodle. Lehigh has named theirs CourseSite.
      • Note that Moodle is a free tool. If you're interested, you can set up your own Moodle and use if for teaching your classes--an example is here.
    • Course bookmarks--some websites that you may find useful during the semester.
    • And in case you don't have one already in front of you: classroom laptops
  • Reviewing syllabus
    • Part 1: General overview, expectations
    • Part 2: Assignments
  • Conceptual work:
    • What is social studies? (via Jigsaw(-ish) activity)
      • Individual work for 10 minutes
      • Report out: Describe what you looked at, what you discussed. Instructor will make a list.
      • Consider: Different lenses, overlapping lenses to social studies
  • Instruction presentation: What is social studies? A natural evolution in education? A historical oddity? An ill-defined object? A battlefield?
  • What is a social studies methods course?
    • Content? Techniques? Lesson planning?
    • Significance of model lessons: LGL / Jigsaw, Hilda Taba
  • Why does social studies matter?
  • What does social studies need to look like in the 21st century? Example of shifting needs: Civil Rights Movement: Should we focus on Claudette Colvin and not just Rosa Parks? Should we draw attention to Bayard Rustin? Is Fannie Lou Hamer the hinge between social and political revolution? Or should we look at Emmett Till and juxtapose him with Tamir Rice?
  • Closure: Discussion of WTL, original instructional materials assignments

After class

  • Reading
    • Chapin, Ch. 1
    • C3 Framework: intro material & history section
    • PDE standards for history
    • Common Core (well, "PA Core") standards for reading & writing in "History and Social Studies"
    • NCSS, 2008. In fact, the whole list of NCSS position statements is probably worth bookmarking!
    • Optional: Mehlinger, 1988; Crocco, 2004
  • Assignments
    • Download and organize relevant standards: C3 Framework, PDE standards on history, geography, civics, & economics, etc.
    • WTL (start your thread in the CourseSite): Take 20 minutes to ... write the history of the world. Seriously. Just give it your best effort. See what's in the ol' memory bank. Then take a look at and comment on a classmate's work.
    • Update your profile in CourseSite to include your picture
    • Complete your first original instructional material and bring it to class next week. Don't forget to include a paragraph explaining its intended use. 
    • Start lining up an HTCE participant

 

Session 2 - Wednesday, 3 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and bring in your OIP #1
  • Complete readings
  • Download and file the standards; read the history standards
  • Complete WTL

During class (ppt)

After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook: Zevin, Ch. 2 & 10
    • Optional: Teacher dispositions: Thornton, 2001
    • Definitely read: Keeler & Langhorst, 2008 (to help plan for original instructional material product #2)
    • Read & mark up: History standards (C3 & PDE of your choice)
    • Read far enough to grasp HTCE assignment: Barton & Levstik, 1996
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Complete and turn in HTCE prep work

 

Session 3 - Wednesday, 10 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in HTCE prep work. It might help to read Barton & Levstik, 1996 before you do this.
  • Complete WTL
  • Complete reading

 

During class (ppt)

  • Two bits of business I forgot to get to last week
    • "A Very Short Introduction" series: http://bit.ly/1XlbOt7 – use these as content resources to get ready for the Praxis or to help prep a course 
    • Portfolio work!
  • Conceptual work
    • Here's the history ed resource we'll be using: Geography of Slavery database from the Virginia Center for Digital History at UVA.
    • More playing with primary sources: King Phillip's War
    • Digging into the research base
      • Work of Sam Wineburg
      • Work of Barton & Levstik
  • Closure

 

After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook: Zevin, Ch. 5 & 6
    • Barton & Levstik, 2003
    • Wineburg, 1991 (sourcework)
    • Hicks, Doolittle & Ewing, 2004
    • Optional: Lee & Clark, 2004 (digital history, SCIM-C)
    • Gross-Loh, 2016 (article from The Atlantic) on a history class at Harvard – lots of great, quick exposure to issues in history ed, some good thoughts on methods
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in OIP #2, don’t forget to include *reflection*
    • (Capture what we worked on tonight: File away the Geography of Slavery and other resources, grab some primary source heuristics, write some notes on what’s in your methods toolbox [timelines!], etc.)
    • WTL on history methods & dispositions

 

Session 4 - Wednesday, 17 Feb

Before class

  • Complete and turn in your OIP #2; don't forget the reflection! See syllabus for details
  • WTL
  • Complete reading

During class (ppt on instructional planningppt on history ed)

  • OIP #2 brief sharing
  • Assignments: Next up is course plan. How to approach it.
  • Some work on instructional planning
  • More history ed
    • Something traditionalist that I didn't get to last week
    • Pivoting towards a civic-oriented stance w/Wikipedia
    • Going bonkers with Wikipedia: Wikipedia as applied epistemology? Something no disciplinarian can resist?
    • More civics-oriented suggestions
      • Contemporary parallels?
      • Local relevance?
      • "So what?" strategy
      • The "Secret History" strategy for including under-privileged voices
  • Closure

After class

 

Session 5 - Wednesday, 24 Feb

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Complete and turn in course plan #1

During class (ppt)

  • Wrapping up history ed
  • Opening up civics ed
    • Connections between civics and history
    • Civics as a "high-stakes" content area: USCIS
    • Opening salvos on content, methods
      • Analyzing visual images about the branches of government
      • Mock elections, mock polling
  • What makes civics special?

 

After class

  • Reading
    • Civics standards: PDE, C3 – read and mark up!
    • Zevin, Ch. 11
    • And as a goodbye to history ed: Fallace, 2010
    • Optional: Hammond & Manfra, 2009
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in first installment of Fieldwork (just a short statement)
    • Complete WTL in CourseSite

Session 6 - Wednesday, 2 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading. Please *DO* mark up the civics standards. This is a bigger deal than usual!!
  • Complete WTL
  • Turn in update on your fieldwork

During class (ppt)

  • Any probs with fieldwork update?
  • Something you've probably been overlooking: General-use forum in CourseSite
  • Civics
  • Closure: Think about microteaching!

After class

  • Reading
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in Course Plan #2
    • Complete WTL in CourseSite
    • Start thinking about microteaching! When you want to do it, what you want to teach

 

Session 7 - Wednesday, 9 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Complete WTL
  • Complete & turn in Course plan #2
  • NEW: Request your microteaching topic and time: http://bit.ly/1pdkLJJ

During class (ppt)

After class

  • Reading
    • Hammond & Manfra, 2009 (at long last!)
    • Zevin, Ch. 4
  • Assignments
    • WTL: Civics ed, give three lesson ideas (one G, one P, one M) on a topic
    • Complete and turn in your CURRICULUM MAP


No class on Wednesday, 16 Mar; Lehigh University on Spring Break (14-18 Mar)

 

Session 8 - Wednesday, 23 Mar

No face-to-face class on this day (Dr. Hammond at a conference). However, you will have work on to complete during this week

 

Session 9 - Wednesday, 30 Mar

Before class

  • Complete and turn in Curriculum Map
  • Complete reading

 

During class (ppt)

  • Microteaching: Dr. H will demo (using GIS); Laura will test out technology...
  • Conceptual work: Assessment & social studies
    • Generic purposes & assumptions of assessment: sequestered, individual tasks; assessment OF learning vs. assessment FOR learning; accountability / the 'bottom line' vs. the challenges of failure (or being passed along)
    • Reviewing things you (may?) already know – formative v. summative, etc.
    • Assessment in the context of social studies: What's the bottom line, again? Significance of schema, level of non-information in traditional assessments.
    • Examination of the work of Sam Wineburg, Gabriel Reich. Test items as text: compare primary source heuristics & test-wiseness
    • Examples of non-traditional assessment: Quick look back at example of a digital documentary. (This was made using PrimaryAccess.) Other tools: Glogster, Prezi, good ol' powerpoint (albeit perhaps used non-traditionally), a discussion board, etc. 
      • Essay group
        • Start with the Free Response Question. Individually examine the question and the images, then individually outline an answer. Then read the sample student response and score it with a rubric. Discuss your scoring. 
        • Move to the Document-Based Question. Examine the question and the documents, but skip writing your own answer. Examine the rubric, then look at the sample student response. Score it individually, then discuss.  
      • Collaborative test-taking group
        • Answer the first ten questions on your own. 
        • Answer the second ten questions on your own; then stop and discuss them. Note places where you changed your answers and provide an explanation of why. 
        • Answer the last ten questions on your own. Then use a computer to explore these questions further. Change your answers as needed, and document your changes (i.e., provide new answer, explain your new understanding, and provide links to relevant sites)  
    • Assessment resources: see course bookmarks for full listing (delicious.com/tchammond/assessment)

  • Closure: Don't forget that you will be assessed, too! Taking a look at the Praxis.

 

After class

  • Reading
    • Reich, 2009
    • Optional: Hammond, 2014; Snyder & Hammond, 2012
    • Zevin, Ch. 8 (assessment)
  • Assignments
    • WTL on assessment ideas for your unit
    • If you're microteaching, prep!
    • Work on field work, HTCE, unit overview

 

 

Session 10 - Wednesday, 6 Apr

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Complete WTL
  • work on remaining assignments

 

During class (ppt)

After class

  • Reading
    • Zevin, Ch. 9
    • NAEP & Praxis links – look back at previous session, from March 30
    • Materials in CourseSite about writing objectives, framing Essential Questions
    • optional: Alibrandi & Sarnoff, 2006
  • Assignments
    • Complete & turn in unit overview
    • WTL (most of you already did this ages ago!)

 

 

Session 11 - Wednesday, 13 Apr

Before class

During class

  • Microteaching: 
    • Sarah M., "Understanding Fiscal Responsibility"
    • James C., "Trading Around the World" (Can also feel free to do Play-Doh Economics!!)
    • Michelle S., Echoes & Reflections

 

After class

 

Session 12 - Wednesday, 20 Apr

Before class

  • Microteaching: If you haven't already, turn in your reflection!
  • Unit overview: If you haven't already, turn it in!
  • HTCE final report: If you haven't already, turn it in!

During class (ppt)

  • Microteaching de-brief?
  • Unit overview --> final unit
  • Conceptual topic #1– adaptation & accommodation of diverse learners: 
    • Getting started: Meet Tyler
    • What teacher knowledge / skill is required here? A lifetime of learning to be done here, but we will focus on building you a "survival kit" of strategies 
    • Closure: How does this influence your thinking about your unit? How does it connect to the purposes of social studies?
  • Conceptual topic #2: Pushing forward with geography ed
  • Closure

 

After class

  • Reading
    • (check out any materials you didn't get a chance to examine in class – see links above)
    • Milson, Gilbert, & Earle, 2007 (geography ed that does a nice job of addressing diversity themes)
    • Wineburg & Martin, 2009 (history ed, but discusses adapting sources)
    • Au, 2009 (good gloss on inclusive education)
  • Assignments – if you need more time on any of these, let me know!
    • Microteaching: If you haven't already, turn in your reflection!
    • Unit overview: If you haven't already, turn it in!
    • HTCE final report: If you haven't already, turn it in!
    • Fieldwork: Write up and turn in final report!

 

Session 13 - Wednesday, 27 Apr

Before class

  • Complete reading!
  • Complete assignments!

During class (ppt)

 

After class

  • Reading
    • Econ standards (C3, PDE; NCEE if you want it)

    • Zevin, Ch. 12

    • Caldwell & O'Driscoll, 2007

    • Fraser, 2007

    • File & refer back to: Day, 2006

  • Assignments
    • Turn in whatever's left!
    • Complete WTL forum

 

 

Session 14 - Wednesday, 4 May

Before class

During class

After class

 

Wednesday, May 11: Any outstanding assignments / revisions due at this point

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