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Session 1 - Monday, 17 Jan

Before class

  • If you can,
    • Obtain a copy of the textbook (Lee, 2008, Visualizing Elementary Social Studies Methods). The bookstore should have it; Amazon has it; used copies are fine.
    • Cruise this wiki and the CourseSite.
    • Think deeply about the trade-offs of having a social studies methods class on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • Introductions
    • Looking at our toolbox: CourseSite, wiki, bookmarks, etc.
    • Reviewing syllabus
      • Assignments and grading
    • Questions thus far?
  • Conceptual work
    • What is social studies?
      • Jigsaw(-ish) / LGL activity
        • Form SEVEN groups
          • Group A: NCSS materials, publications
          • Group B: PA standards, textbooks
          • Group C: Content-area groups' materials
          • Group D: "Education market" materials
          • Group E: Maps
          • Group F: Internet links .
          • Group G: Discussion: What do you remember from your elementary social studies experiences? If you can't remember any, feel free to move up to middle level. What topics did you do? What did you read? Watch? Discuss? What sorts of tasks or assessments did you complete?
        • Group work for 10 minutes
        • Report out: Describe what you looked at, what you discussed. Instructor will make a list.
        • Group: Look over the list and create GROUPS of items that seem to be similar.
        • Label: Identify each group by a short (1-4 word) label.
    • What is social studies methods?
      • Content?
      • Techniques?
      • Lesson planning?
    • Who am I as a social studies educator? 
      • Discussion of our first assignment, self-portrait #1
  • Closure
    • Review of what's due next week
    • Review of what's where (wiki, CourseSite)
    • Any questions?

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 1 & 2
    • NCSS, 2008 (linked in CourseSite)
  • Assignment
    • WTL
    • Make your initial self-portrait, turn it in via CourseSite. Don't forget that there is a template and an example.
    • Update your profile in CourseSite to include your picture. 

Session 2 - Monday, 24 Jan

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • Make your initial self-portrait, turn it in via CourseSite. Don't forget that there is a template and an example. Let me know if you're having trouble submitting.
  • Update your profile in CourseSite to include your picture. 

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • (Re) introductions
    • Any problems turning in first self-portrait? Getting to the reading?
  • Conceptual work
    • Sketchmaps & schema
    • Goals of social studies
    • Curricular frameworks
    • Social studies materials -- note that everything I have listed in the ppt is linked from our course bookmark list...
    • Powerful social studies
    • Geography and powerful social studies
      • Geography two ways: Map quiz; considering WHY names are what they are and not just 'what' -- see WP political maps of Canada, Mexico, and Guatemala.
    • Weaving the Globe--this is a lesson I first saw in Social Education and then adapted to my own preferences...
    • Discussion of original instructional materials assignment
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 4
    • Brophy & Alleman, 2002
    • optional: Wade, 2002
    • skim: Keeler & Langhorst, 2008 (to get ideas for tech assigns)
  • Assignments
    • Fill out my Input form for next week's activity: Info on one pair of shoes, one textile item.
    • WTL
    • Complete instructional product #1
    • Start looking for classroom observation opportunities

Session 3 - Monday, 31 Jan

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Complete your original instructional material item #1 AND write up a brief description of its intended use. 
  • WTL
  • Fill out my Input form for next week's activity: Info on one pair of shoes, one textile item.

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • Original instructional materials: Tonight's set-up
      • Pair-and-share, then whole-class. I'll model with the Weaving the Globe activity
      • Pretty ambitious plan for the whole-class stuff -- not sure we're going to get through it...
    • Reminder: I won't be assessing until after the SECOND product. If you want feedback based on your first, let me know. Otherwise, you'll hear from me after the second
  • Conceptual work
    • That info about your clothing...what did I do with that? Here's the kml file, if you want it. 
    • Planning / standards / standards overview
      • PDE standards
        • "old" standards (K-12) -- these are the ones that are still legally binding, and the only format I can find them in anymore is a single, flat webpage. So: search for a useful string such as "civics and government" or "academic standards for economics" (or geography or history).
        • New standards (preK-4 in some areas, 3-8 in others...)
      • National content-area standards: Browse my listing in our course bookmarks.
      • NCSS 'thematic strands' -- after working with these for a while, I finally get why they're NOT standards. They're about balance (not neglecting certain areas) and taking the long view -- they are NOT a roadmap of content or skills. 
      • ...what do you need to cite and when?
    • Teaching geography
      • Before we dive in, let's do a little KWL on geography.
      • Standards
      • Curriculum
        • Nothing exists in Pennsylvania at the state-wide level.
        • Within districts in PA, nothing is posted at ASD (at last check); BASD has grades 3 on up.
        • I'm going to use Indiana's social studies curriculum as an example, since (a) it exists, and (b) it singles out geography as a continuing topic throughout K-12. This scope-and-sequence guide is pretty clear, too.
      • Sample unit plans
        • This lesson plan on local history and geography actually runs over several consecutive working sessions, forming something in between a unit and a lesson....
      • Sample lessons
        • Demo lesson: Mapping an orange (Map projections) -- see one version of the plan here.
        • More info on map projections
          • Mercator map.
          • Peters map.
          • "Dymaxion" map or Fuller map (Buckminster Fuller).
          • Popular contemporary projections include the Winkel Tripel ... it's a more satisfying trade-off between spatial accuracy / distortion and readability.
          • Non-pedagogical application of the issue: Airline route maps--I'll use an NWA map. Note the arc. A little more dramatic version from Cathay Pacific. (More where that came from airlineroutemaps.com. Who knew such a thing existed??)
      • More on activities and materials
        • Static maps & globes -- you can find a wealth of static maps online. Feel free to start here.
        • Dynamic
          • Globes -- Google Earth is of course the kingpin here. See a blog of teaching ideas for using Google Earth.
          • Maps
            • Flickr map.
              • Groups within Flickr can have their own maps -- I'm partial to the map from the Islam\ group.
            • National Geographic's Map Machine can be used for many activities
            • Google Maps can be customized to do interesting things, especially for projects on your local environment or other places where the geography / spatial relationship is very important. Here is a Google Map I made to plan a trip to Washington, DC. (Not very interesting, sorry -- just demonstrates potential of the tool.)-
            • Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are also powerful tools for using and making dynamic maps.-
      • NOTE: Geography is more than "where is everything and what is it named?"-
        • PA geography standards on culture & the environment-
        • Study of human / cultural geography-
        • Significance of geography for special needs students? English language-learners?-
        • ...and now to re-visit that KWL form (above) and complete the last step. View the results ... how did we do?
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 6, 12
    • Take a moment to look for info online about ESL and/or special needs students and geography. For example: here's an ESL social studies unit
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Work on original instructional materials assignment, product #2

Session 4 - Monday, 7 Feb

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • Work on original instructional materials assignment #2

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • At the end of class, we'll take a look at the specifications for the Original Instructional Materials assignment, part #2 (and reflection)
  • Conceptual work
    • Teaching and learning social studies: Inquiry vs. didactic models
      • Model lesson: What the world eats
        • Captions -- match these with the images in the ppt; Countries -- locate these countries on the map. 
        • Family food images taken from TIME magazine photo essay about the book, Hungry Planet. Note the parallel to the book Material World. Both seem like great resources
        • Extensions: 
          • Pop the images onto a map! Someone has done this using Microsoft's Live Maps. I would have done it with Google Maps or as a Google Earth overlay.
          • One of the things I like about this image set is the level of contextualization: We have some info about the family and their location, not just their country. So: Could you locate not just the country but the location (e.g., Tingo, Ecuador)? What resources could you use to do this? 
      • Discussion of inquiry vs. didactic models of instruction
      • Suggested framework: Giving, prompting, & making (Hammond & Manfra, 2009)
        • In textbook: direct instruction (Ch. 8), active learning / inquiry (Ch. 3, 9, 11)
      • Can we put our methods to date into some sort of a categorization? Consider the following: 
        • What we've done in class thus far: List-group-label, sketchmaps, looking for patterns in the names on maps, mapping an orange, Weaving the Globe, What the World Eats
        • Take a look at what's in the textbook reading thus far (each lesson concludes with a sample lesson--how would you characterize the methods in each?)
        • What other methods do you know? (E.g., a WebQuest, a simulation or role-playing activity.) How might they fit into your categories?
    • Teaching geography and world cultures: "Them" is "We"
      • Model lesson: Video study & population density enactive
        • Video via YouTube
        • Additional visuals (note that plenty more can be found in, among other places, flickr).
        • Enactive -- note that this will require some tweaking for younger learners...more scaffolded math process (or eliminate it altogether). The technique, however (i.e., giving an EXPERIENCE of a topic) is invaluable for all learners, but particularly younger ones.
        • Extension
        • (FYI: The non-YouTube visuals and the enactive are adapted from the Geography Alive! materials from Teachers Curriculum Institute. Amazon link here. If you liked these materials, definitely consider buying this. If you're not sure, ask to borrow my materials. And if you want to watch Geography Alive! in a Live! format, I believe Saucon Valley uses it, or at least some SV teachers do.)
      • "Them" vs. "We"; "Othering" vs. identifying
        • Let's view a clip from a speech by novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie given at Oxford, July 2009. The title is "The danger of a single story" . We'll just watch the first 4:14; then we'll skip ahead to 10:57-11:57 (thank YOU for the interactive transcript!!!)
        • Sample instructional challenges
          • How did the previous activities ("What the World Eats", YouTube clips, population density enactive) reinforce or challenge a Single Story about different cultures / places? 
          • Consider a sample material: Haitian voodoo flag. Poses many possibilities (e.g., combine with writing or math activities), but is also a complex, easily misread artifact. Assuming you had one in your possession, what's one GOOD idea you might have for designing instruction? What's one DANGEROUS line of instruction, one that would lead to "othering" / stereotyping / a Single Story?  
        • Put it into action: Where in children's lit can we find multiple stories / perspectives on cultures? On historical events?
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Textbook: Lee, Ch. 3, 8
    • Optional: Hammond & Manfra, 2009
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Complete original instructional materials assignment, product #2 (and reflection)
    • Start looking for someone to interview for your History Through a Child's Eyes assignment

Session 5 - Monday, 14 Feb

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • Complete original instructional materials assignment #2, bring to class ready to share. Don't forget to do the reflection, and do check the requirements for topics to address. 

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • A little re-arranging tonight in the interest of shortening class....
  • Conceptual work
    • Assessment & schema
    • TIME PERMITTING: Pedagogical options, re-framing: trivial / interactive / authentic** Demo lessons with images** Hide-and-seek within an image**** The image I used came from the Library of Congress' American Memory project--great source for getting photos PLUS contextual info.
        • Slow reveal of an image (again, image source is NARA child labor activity)***** The source of the image is the National Archives. They put together an activity on child labor; see a larger list of such activities here. Great source material for activities--excellent content, great ideas on pedagogy.
        • Photo analysis (again, image and scaffold are from NARA)
        • Zoom-in / shifting focus. Note that this requires (a) a very high-quality image, such as a TIFF, and (b) an image viewer that will allow you to move around in the image without too much hassle.
      • What was authentic, interactive, or trivial about what we just did?
      • Compare to earlier examples (of assessment, above)
      • Consider earlier demo lessons – are we receiving thick or thin samples of students' schema
      • Connecting to giving-prompting-making
  • Closure: Tonight's topics and your assignments

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 9, 11, & 13 -- we'll be re-visiting these
    • optional: Schurr, 1992
  • Assignments 
    • WTL
    • Complete (if you haven't already) your first observation; turn it in (or at least give a place-holder)
    • Start working on curriculum map
    • Start lining up a participant for your HTCE
    • Time-shifting the Original Instructional Materials assignment, item #2
      • POST your material to your WTL thread. You don't need to also post the reflection, but do give contextual info on what the product is, how it works. 
      • COMMENT on your partner's product (in their thread)
      • RESPOND to your partner's comment (in your thread)
      • (repeat as needed / desired)

Session 6 - Monday, 21 Feb

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • ...

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • ...
  • Conceptual work 
    • Pedagogical options, re-framing: trivial / interactive / authentic
      • Demo lessons with images
        • Hide-and-seek within an image
          • The image I used came from the Library of Congress' American Memory project--great source for getting photos PLUS contextual info.
        • Slow reveal of an image (again, image source is NARA child labor activity)
          • The source of the image is the National Archives. They put together an activity on child labor; see a larger list of such activities here. Great source material for activities--excellent content, great ideas on pedagogy.
        • Photo analysis (again, image and scaffold are from NARA)
        • Zoom-in / shifting focus. Note that this requires (a) a very high-quality image, such as a TIFF, and (b) an image viewer that will allow you to move around in the image without too much hassle.
      • What was authentic, interactive, or trivial about what we just did?
      • Compare to earlier examples (of assessment, above)
      • Consider earlier demo lessons -- are we receiving thick or thin samples of students' schema
      • Connecting to giving-prompting-making
    • History instruction
      • What is it we're talking about when we talk about history? History instruction?
      • Florida standards for grade 4 .
      • Story of Aaron – note that this is drawn from the Geography of Slavery database at the University of Virginia's Center for Digital History.
      • Closure on teaching history: How was what we just did similar to / different from what you expected? How does it change things (or not) for your students?
    • Social studies resources
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 9, 11, 13
    • Optional: Nifty piece in today's New York Times about the legacy of Mount Vernon, focusing on Washington's former slaves (well, the former slaves of the extended Washington family) and their role in shaping its history (in the context of cultural / market forces of the day)
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Work on curriculum map assignment
    • Complete self-portrait #2

Session 7 - Monday, 28 Feb

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • ...

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
  • Conceptual work: History education as a problem area
    • First set of questions
    • Three problems to work on
      • What kind of history? Open or closed?
      • What structures can we use that will make sense to teachers and students?
      • What connection can we make to the aims of social studies education (citizenship prep)?
    • Second set of questions
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Zhao & Hoge, 2005
    • Optional: If you want to dig deeper into history ed, I loaded a bunch of additional articles: Barton & Levstik, VanSledright, Tiemann & Fallace, etc.
  • Assignments
    • Sign up for microteaching and then view the schedule (once it goes live); if you're slated to teach next class, please prepare.
    • WTL
    • Please (if you're willing) complete the second set of questions linked above in the classwork section
    • Complete curriculum map assignment

Monday, 7 March: No class – Lehigh University spring break

Session 8 - Monday, 14 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • ...

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • Where do we stand on assignments?
  • Microteaching: This week's champions are
    • Josh L.
    • Angela L.
    • Ian J.
  • Conceptual work: History ed, focusing on chronology
    • Silent timeline, two ways. What other ways could we do this?
    • Google Earth & chronology (plus a little how-to on Google Earth markups), focusing on European voyages of exploration -- here's the file, if you want to play with it. Also note the framing: Opening question, working with primary sources. 
    • Interactive whiteboards: SmartNotebook demo discussion on Triangular Trade (and other topics). If you have access to the software, here's the file I'm using for my demo
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Barton & Levstik, 1996 (this is the article the HTCE assignment is drawn from)
    • Optional
      • Tiemann & Fallace, 2009
      • Fallace, Biscoe, & Perry, 2007
    • File away for future reference: USCIS, 2007
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Work on unit plan outline
    • Work on HTCE! 

Session 9 - Monday, 21 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • Work on unit plan outline
  • Work on HTCE

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • A wrinkle on microteaching
    • Introduction: Say hello in absentia to Jenny Parks
  • Microteaching
    • R. Headman
    • Tiana B.
    • Joe S.
    • ...so how would that work with students with different needs?
  • Conceptual work: Civics
    • What's so special about civics?
    • Fun intermezzo: Questions from the US Citizenship Test. Flashcards here, quibbles with the answers (and quibbles with the quibbles) here.
    • Counter-example and example of teaching about civics, using images from the State of the Union address
    • What kind of citizen?
    • Civic dispositions
    • Closing lesson / reflection: rights and privileges across different groups
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading: Lee Ch 7, optional: Vorhaus, 2005
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Complete unit plan outline
    • Work on HTCE

Session 10 - Monday, 28 Mar

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • ...

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • ...
  • Microteaching
    • Tracy R.
    • Karen M.
    • Paige M.
  • Conceptual work: Civics ed, second pass
    • Re-cap of last week's discussion
    • Tonight: Additional layers, loosely organized around  'What kind of citizen' discussion from last week
      • KNOWLEDGEABLE citizen
        • Knowing about local events, access: As a form of tracking current events, consider local newspapers, especially photo features. Example of the challenges: LehighValleyLive, Bethlehem section. Example of the opportunities: Morning Call photo gallery--see especially the daily photos feature. What civics information is presented here?
      • PARTICIPATORY CITIZEN: 
        • First, let's run a little simulation. (It has some similarity to this lesson from the House of Representatives' site.) What pedagogical payoffs does this have? What knowledge did you gain? What other simulations might you run? To help prep our understanding of what goes on, we might want to look at some of the following diagrams
        • Now that we're armed with experience, let's look at government in action. We can access a surprising level of information about our state and federal governments. For example: See a time-stamped description of the House activity and Senate calendars. Next, pair up and explore
          • Federal links
            • WHO: Find your representative (upper lefthand side of page, "Find your representative"), find your senators (upper right-hand side, "Find your senators")
              • Keep in mind that MOST of what you see about them on their official sites is PR / spin / not to be taken too seriously. What's important here? How might you make it accessible to young learners?
              • One useful bit of information is the member's office location. Is there an office close to your home or school? Can you visit? Make a field trip? Invite a speaker to come to your class? 
            • WHAT
              • What legislation have they sponsored? Look in the Library of Congress' site (thomas.loc.gov), "Browse Bills by Sponsor"
              • Where did this legislation end up? Which committee did it get referred to? Where did it end up? 
              • Whose interests did this legislation serve? (Note: This is EXTREMELY hard to figure out, sometimes)
            • WHO PAYS
              • This all gets a lot harder after the Citizens United decision, but it's still the best tool we have: opensecrets.org -- enter the member's name as 'Recipient' and see who gave to their election fund / PAC / party / allied outside group
              • You can also get an overview of the member's (or candidate's) finances via their profile page. Start here and search --see the right-hand side of the page, "Search database by:"
          • State links
            • WHO: Find your state legislators (assuming you're a PA resident--feel free to try NJ or elsewhere; I just don't have the links handy).
              • Again, MOST of what you see about them on their official sites is PR / spin / not to be taken too seriously. What's important here? How might you make it accessible to young learners?
              • Again, find their office location. Is there an office close to your home or school? Can you visit? Make a field trip? Invite a speaker to come to your class?
            • WHAT: Not nearly as active / current as the federal info, but it's here: search the session information.
            • WHO PAYS: Again, not as well organized as OpenSecrets, but PA (like all other states) keeps records, some of which can be searched here. Place the member's (or candidate's) name in the "Recipient" field and note that you may have to fiddle with the range of dates. 
        • Armed with this knowledge, how might you participate in government? 
      • SOCIAL JUSTICE-ORIENTED citizen: Project Citizen.
        • Some examples via Flickr (none of which have Creative Commons licenses, alas!)
        • FYI: Allentown has very active Project Citizen participation, both in terms of the academic side and the community action side. If you're interested in being involved, please let me know!
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Dee, 2011
    • Naraian, 2011
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Microteaching prep or reflection
    • Complete HTCE
    • Work on unit plan


Session 11 - Monday, 4 Apr

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • ...

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • ...
  • Microteaching
    • R. Hull
    • K. Ashman
    • Janelle F.
  • Conceptual work: We'll start with this handy-dandy survey about your comfort / familiarity with some of tonight's topics. Input here, output here.
    • ...
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
  • Assignments
    • WTL: In your group of three, take your assigned article from Teaching Exceptional Children (available electronically via the Lehigh Library) and assign roles: one person to summarize the article (in 200 words or less) and two people apply the information in the article to their own instructional planning (e.g., unit plan, curriculum map, microteaching lesson, original instructional materials products -- wherever you see a connection.) Feel free to respond to others' posts, but you don't have to.
    • ...

Session 12 - Monday, 11 Apr

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • ...

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • ...
  • Microteaching
    • Angelique P.
    • Melissa F.
    • Sonya D-C
  • Conceptual work
    • From geography to history to civics to economics
    • Economics ed, part 1
      • Enthusiasm gap with economics in elementary ed. Case in point: Our textbook. 
      • For the appropriate content organization (and hence disciplinary cheerleaders), meet the Council for Economic Ed .
        • Standards , of course. Contrast with the PDE economics standards (pdf)
        • Lesson plan database , of course. 
        • Additional CEE resources that are worth pointing out: 
          • A primer on economics -- they recognize that many social studies teachers don't have the strongest background in economics, or the best relationship with this content area. (Note: The PDF is available inside of CourseSite)
          • As an example of something awesome / radical / mind-expanding, check out the CEE's Play-Doh Economics (video, PDF of first edition). We'll be doing an activity from it next week. 
      • Economics (like civics) -- sooooooo active & hands-on. Don't believe me? Try my "economics of candy" lessons.
      • Question about economics education and doctrine--to focus us, let's take a look at pp. 4 & 13 in the PDE economics standards (pdf). Does it have to be this way?
  • Closure on econ
  • Discussion of unit plan: What's required in a lesson plan, what supporting materials are due, etc. 

After class

  • Reading
    • Day, 2006: At least skim through and file away for future reference
    • VanFossen, 2003
  • Assignments
    • WTL -- just be sure to complete the "Teaching Exceptional Children" activity from the previous week. If you're already done: Respond to a peer's post. 
    • Work on unit plan

Session 13 - Monday, 18 Apr

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • ...

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • ...
  • Microteaching
    • Kevin L.
    • Amy S.
    • Will Z.
  • Conceptual work
    • ...
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • ...

Session 14 - Monday, 25 Apr

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • WTL
  • ...

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • Grading
    • Putting this course to bed
  • Conceptual work: Social studies & integration
    • Social studies and children's lit
    • Social studies -> other content area; other content area-> social studies
      • Group 1: Select any TWO lessons from our microteaching; only ONE may be from someone in your group
      • Group 2:
        • option A: brainstorm a lesson using this source material. (If you feel it's too easy or can't think of any ideas, try this version.)
        • option B: Feel free to design something based off of the Weaving the Globe activity (kml file).
        • option C: Feel free to use one of your own lessons or locate a source besides one of those linked above.
      • Group 3:
        • option A: adapt this lesson plan.
        • option B: Feel free to use one of your own lessons or locate a source besides one of those linked above.
      • Group 4: grades 3-4
        • option A: select any activity from this page of the NLVM and adapt it.
        • option B: Feel free to use one of your own lessons or locate a source besides one of those linked above.
    • Arts integration
    • Integrating sports?
  • Closure: Graduation ceremony, with a closing thought from Vaclav Havel
  • Course evals. In addition to the paper forms, you can also submit anonymous feedback straight to me, if you wish.

After class

  • Reading
    • Au, 2009
    • Lovorn, 2009
  • Assignments
    • Final self-portrait, if you haven't done it already
    • Complete unit plan, if you haven't done it already
    • (finish up any remaining assignments!)

...go back to top?

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