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Session 1 - Monday, 29 Aug

Before class

  • Buy a copy of the textbook (Maxim, 2017, Dynamic Social Studies for Constructivist Classrooms). Amazon has it; 10th edition copies (which you can find used) are probably fine. 
  • Cruise this wiki and the CourseSite.
  • I have paper copies of the syllabus; you don't have to print out a copy yourself.

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
    • Introductions
    • Looking at our toolbox: CourseSite, wiki, bookmarks, etc.
    • Reviewing syllabus
      • Assignments and grading
      • First step: Completing your first WTL entries
    • Questions thus far?
  • Conceptual work
    • What is social studies?
    • What is social studies methods?
      • Content?
      • Techniques?
      • Lesson planning?
    • Who am I as a social studies educator?
  • Closure
    • Review of what's due next week – reminder about filling in info for "Weaving the Globe"
    • Review of what's where (wiki, CourseSite)
    • Any questions?
    • Stick around for portfolio work

After class

  • Reading
    • Maxim, Ch. 1 (What is?)
    • Crocco, 2004 (as an overview and critique of the field – if nothing else, this should motivate you to be an informed, critical consumer of social studies materials)
    • NCSS, 2009

  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Update your profile in CourseSite to include your picture
    • Starting planning out your upcoming assignments: Original Instructional Materials product #1, who you'll interview for HTCE, etc. 
    • Bookmark class websites on your computer (e.g., CourseSite, relevant wiki pages)
    • Fill out the “Weaving the Globe” input form.
    • Input your portfolio URL ASAP

 

Session 2 - Monday, 4 Sep

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Think ahead: What do you want to do for your Original Instructional Materials assignments? Are you able to find a preK-4 student to interview for the HTCE? 

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Conceptual work
    • Opening activity: Sketchmaps
    • Sketchmaps & schema
    • Examples of how social studies schema are complicated / slippery / layered
    • NCSS on the purpose of social studies
    • Curricular frameworks
    • A proposed, deliberately provocative framework of aims: A three-ring circus
    • NCSS and powerful social studies
    • Digging into geography
      • Standards – analyze these for suggested / implicit curricular frameworks and aims
        • PDE (all via CourseSite)
          • new geography, 3-8
          • new geography, preK-2.
        • C3 Framework – note that for geography, they reach back to the old "Five Themes" of geography.
      • Parsing it a little more simply
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Maxim, re-visit Ch. 1 section on standards, read Ch. 10 (Geography)

    • Re-visit NCSS, 2009

    • skim Brophy & Alleman, 2002

    • optional: Wade, 2002

    • skim: Keeler & Langhorst, 2008 (to get ideas for orig inst materials assigns)

  • Assignments 
    • WTL
    • Complete instructional product #1, bring it to class ready to share!


Session 3 Monday, 11 Sep

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Complete and bring in your Original Instructional Material assignment #1, bring it to class. (But don't forget to also upload it to CourseSite!)
  • Complete the WTL

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Original instructional materials work
    • Getting ready to share our OIP #1s. I'll be demoing using this Google Earth file built from the data you gave me (plus older data)
    • Sharing 
    • Talking about OIM #2: Check out my SmartBoard-based puzzle map of South America. What approach to geography is it? (Traditional) So: For your OIM #2, try a new-to-you technology (SmartBoard? Google Earth?), a different lens (traditional vs. disciplinary vs. student-centered) – mix it up! Stretch your thinking and your tech skills!
  • Conceptual work
    • Re-visiting three stances of geography ed, demo'd with three methods
      • "Weaving the Globe" (which we did last week)
      • SmartBoard puzzle map (which we did as part of sharing OIP #1)
      • "What's in a Place Name?"
    • Taking a look at standards
    • Digging into geography's Big Ideas
      • Natural environment vs. built environment
      • Physical geography vs. political, economic, or human geography
      • Human-environment interaction
      • Tools of geographic representation
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Review Geography standards: PDE, C3; see other nat’l orgs as you see fit

    • Read Barton & Levstik, 1996 (at least to the point where you understand context of HTCE assignment)

  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in HTCE prep work

    • WTL

    • Work on original instructional materials assignment, product #2

    • Please consider sharing your OIM #1 by uploading to the Forum in CourseSite for this week’s class

 

Session 4 - Monday, 18 September

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Prepare and turn in HTCE prep
  • Complete WTL

During class (ppt)

After class

  • Reading
    • optional: Hammond, Bodzin, & Stanlick, 2014
    • If you haven't already: Read through PDE ELPS, or at least the stuff I extracted for social studies.
  • Assignments
    • Complete & turn in OIP #2. (If you need help thinking of something: re-read Keeler & Langhorst, 2008)


Session 5 Monday, 25 Sep

Before class

  • Complete the reading.
  • Complete and turn in your Original Instructional Material #2. Don't forget to write the reflection! (See syllabus for details)

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Conceptual work
    • Diversity ed implication of geography (and more! History, civics, you name it): 
      • Here are some images / webmaps I'm drawing from 
        • Flickr world map, search for 'families' in 'N'Djamena'. Note that it comes up a little off from N'Djamena, so we have to zoom out a bit to see where we are. 
      • If you haven't seen all of it already, I recommend seeing Chimamanda Adichie's TED talk. I played just a small portion; feel free to watch more 
    • History ed work
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Skim: Hammond & Manfra, 2009
    • Maxim, Ch. 9 (history – note how this is first in his content-specific chapters?)
    • History standards (at least skim): PDE, C3; look at NCHS if you wish
    • Maxim, Ch. 5, 6, 7, & 8 – just get started on this; they expand upon the pedagogical points I was making tonight, and they also provide lots of great history-oriented instructional ideas (for example, think of what we did tonight as you read 'Pictures and Study Prints'; 'Biographies' & 'Historical Fiction' are clearly great frameworks for exploring history). You can finish them up later, but give a quick skim for now and maybe drill down on one of the four chapters
  • Assignments
    • WTL on history ed
    • Field experience update
    • Think ahead about curriculum map

Session 6 Monday, 2 Oct

Before class

  • Complete readings–note that I crossed off some bits
  • Complete and turn in fieldwork update / "first installment"
  • Do WTL

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Conceptual work
    • Pushing forward on history ed methods
    • Pedagogical framing: Giving-Prompting-Making; observe how this overlays with the stances
    • And a deep, philosophical look at Why: Why do we teach history?
    • Back into history ed methods: Things with timelines
    • And a closing question or two about Wikipedia
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Maxim, Ch. 3 & 4– these expand upon the pedagogical points I was making tonight, but with a much better theory base.
    • Maxim, Ch. 5-8 – keep working through these.
    • Re-visit history education standards; what reasons do they give for WHY study history??
  • Assignments
    • Complete and turn in curriculum map. Don't forget the reflection!


Session 7 - Monday, 9 Oct 

Before class

  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
    • Qs about turning in curriculum map?
    • Organizing microteaching
    • Thinking about curriculum map
  • Conceptual work: Finishing off history ed
    • Re-visiting big picture from geography ed & what we've covered thus far in history ed
    • Wikipedia work
    • Extending wikipedia work
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Read whatever is at the level that interests you most (preK-4)
      • Barton, 1997 (4th & 5th grade)
      • Tiemann & Fallace, 2009 (K)
      • Jensen, 2009 (5th grade...but applies broadly)
  • Assignments
    • Tell me where you would like to fall in the microteaching schedule, using this handy form (also linked in CourseSite). 
    • Working ahead: Think about unit overview


Session 8 Monday, 23 Oct 

Before class

  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
    • Unit overview Qs
  • Conceptual work: (What do I need to cover in basic instructional planning? For example: Writing objectives?)
  • Conceptual work: Getting started on civics ed
    • Initiating activity #1: Branches of government
    • Initiating activity #2: Community resources
      • Let's start with an activity, or sequence of activities. It's a twist on the classic 'community helpers' topic (see some sample materials, if you need to, or consult this set of lesson descriptions), but it takes a broader frame: 'community needs' vs. 'community resources'. If you want to look through the materials:
        • The game was created using arisgames.org; I'll be happy to share the game so you can see it and make a copy to tinker on your own.
        • Here's a sample Google Earth overlay I made, focusing on the area around Building 21, in Allentown. Note that you need to create one that is relevant to whatever school environment you would want to run the activity in.
        • Here's the handout (one sheet for classwork, one sheet for homework).
    • What do these activities tell us about civics? 
    • Another look at civics ed: questions from the US Customs & Immigration Service
    • Some standard questions as we encounter a new content area
      • What are the content-area associations that focus on civics ed? Center for Civic Ed (http://www.civiced.org/) is the biggie.
      • What are the standards for civics ed? PDE, C3 Framework (in CourseSite); Center for Civic Ed (CCE) also has their own set of standards
      • What are some resources for civics ed? https://del.icio.us/tchammond/TLT412,civics --see also the 'We the People' and 'Project Citizen' materials from CCE
      • What are different approaches to civics ed – traditional? Disciplinary? Community-centered?
      • What's so special about civics education?
    • Three salient 'buckets' of civics resources
      • Bucket #1: Materials from the Center for Civic Education
      • Bucket #2: Materials from iCivics
        • About page – be sure to check out some of the info under "Our Impact" to get a sense of what grade(s) they think this is for and how they feel they're doing.
        • Scope-and-sequence – just get a sense for what topics and methods they have going on. Note that they don't make any statements about what grade levels should work on which topics!
        • Games – these are all Flash-based and therefore might not work on some mobile devices. I picked a timely one: "Cast Your Vote"
        • ...de-brief
      • Bucket #3: And now some other materials, that you'll hopefully have more context for by this point
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Civics standards: PDE, C3, and perhaps (your call) Center for Civic Ed. All of these are available in the folder in CourseSite
    • Maxim, Ch. 11
    • Westheimer & Kahne, 2004
    • As needed: Review materials on instructional objectives
  • Assignments
    • If you are microteaching: Prep your lesson and materials
    • (If you need to revise or otherwise keep working on your unit overview late, that's fine. Just let me know)


Session 9 - Monday, 30 October

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • (No assignment to turn in)


During class (ppt)

  • Microteaching
    • Julia G.
    • Chris M.
    • Eden W.
  • Conceptual work: Moving forward with civics ed
      • Re-visiting what we did last week
      • Some standard questions as we encounter a new content area
        • What are the content-area associations that focus on civics ed? Center for Civic Ed (http://www.civiced.org/) is the biggie.
        • What are the standards for civics ed? PDE, C3 Framework (in CourseSite); Center for Civic Ed (CCE) also has their own set of standards
        • What are some resources for civics ed? https://del.icio.us/tchammond/TLT412,civics --see also the 'We the People' and 'Project Citizen' materials from CCE
        • What are different approaches to civics ed – traditional? Disciplinary? Community-centered?
        • What's so special about civics education?
      • Three salient 'buckets' of civics resources
        • Bucket #1: Materials from the Center for Civic Education
        • Bucket #2: Materials from iCivics
          • About page – be sure to check out some of the info under "Our Impact" to get a sense of what grade(s) they think this is for and how they feel they're doing.
          • Scope-and-sequence – just get a sense for what topics and methods they have going on. Note that they don't make any statements about what grade levels should work on which topics!
          • Games – these are all Flash-based and therefore might not work on some mobile devices. I picked a timely one: "Cast Your Vote"
          • ...de-brief
        • Bucket #3: And now some other materials, that you'll hopefully have more context for by this point
    • Closure

    After class

    • Reading
      • Look at Praxis materials in CourseSite
      • Review instructional planning materials posted during Pacing Break week (Oct 16)
    • Assignments
      • Respond to forum abt Praxis

      • For those microteaching: Prepare!

      • If you just did microteaching: Make sure your materials are shared in the microteaching forum (see CourseSite for current class session); mail me your reflection in the next week or two

      • HTCE due next week; if you need more time, just ask


Session 10 - Monday, 6 November

Before class

  • Complete HTCE – if you need more time, please ask!
  • Complete reading
  • Microteaching: reflect (if you just finished) or prepare (if you're up next!)

During class (ppt)

  • Microteaching
    • Marc C.
    • Taylor E.
    • Naomi A.
  • Conceptual work
    • Wrapping up civics ed
      • Civics education: Here is a video clip of David Souter (recommend starting at 3:35) giving the big picture on civics ed & its urgency. (David Souter: Another retired Supreme Court justice. Has spent at least part of his retirement focusing on civic ed at the state level, in his home state of New Hampshire.) If you want more context for the clip, here's a page from PBS that overviews the entire talk (and offers more clips) – it's 2012, Constitution Day (Sep 17, as you well know...) at the University of New Hampshire.
      • Prediction: Social studies ed, and particularly civics ed, is about to make a comeback. You have no idea what your curriculum is going to be or what kind of time you will be given, but you do have events to work with (for example: Constitution Day, current events) and resources to use (example: TIME for Kids).
    • Assessment, social studies, & elementary learners
      • First a little sidebar on the Praxis
        • Here's what's currently required for elementary cert (skip down to p. 3).
        • Sample practice test – social studies items are 20, 34-42; answers are on pp. 58-59.
      • Assessment & schema – i.e., how to keep things focused on INSTRUCTION and not just ACCOUNTABILITY
        • Engaging prior knowledge
          • Memories from elementary?
          • Prior teacher ed coursework?
          • What you've seen in your field placements?
        • Overviewing assessment terms, purposes
        • Assessment resources: see course bookmarks for full listing (del.icio.us/tchammond/TLT412+assessment)
    • Closure


After class

  • Microteaching: reflect (if you just finished) or prepare (if you're up next!)
  • Complete & turn in field report paper (plus supporting materials)
  • Reading
    • Look back at Maxim, ch. 2 (assessment section)
    • Look back at Shurr reading on alternative assessment formats (see Oct 16, pacing break)


Session 11 - Monday, 13 November

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Complete & turn in field report paper (plus supporting materials)


During class (no ppt this week – I'm just using materials linked from this wiki)

  • Microteaching
    • Corey P.
    • Christina N.
    • Youme K.
  • Conceptual work: Discussing inclusion / adaptation & accommodation for diverse learners
    • I am by no means an expert on this, but this is a HUGE topic for social studies, for at least two reasons
      • Practicality: Given that social studies isn't a high stakes-assessed area in Pennsylvania, it's the content area in which LEAs are most eager to show inclusive practice.
      • Ideology: If social studies is about preparing citizens...we need to have an inclusive classroom. In fact, an inclusive social studies classroom in which adaptation & accommodation need to take place is a SUPERIOR environment for social studies ed, rather than a more homogeneous classroom. 
    • Here's what I have for you: Four different approaches to the topic. I'll have you explore one of these as part of a group. Discuss within your group: What about this is familiar? What about it is new? Think back to the microteaching lessons your group members have done – how would / should you change it to include this approach? 
  • Closure

After class

  • Assignments
    • Work on instructional unit! Note that I posted a WTL forum, if you feel the need to discuss. 
    • Microteaching: Prepare / reflect as needed
  • Reading
    • Follow up on inclusion links above
    • Read (or at least skim & save) the following articles
      • Cruz & Thornton, 2009
      • Zehler, 1994


Session 12 - Monday, 20 November

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Work on instructional unit (don't forget to use the WTL forum, if that's helpful!)

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Microteaching
    • Lindsay A.
    • Katherine K.
  • Conceptual work: Digging into economics
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Maxim, Ch. 12
    • Read, or at least save, the econ materials in CourseSite. You don't need to read these immediately, but do save them for future reference. They're extremely useful, and they're rare!
  • Assignments
    • Wrap up whatever you haven't finished: HTCE, field paper
    • Complete final unit. BE SURE to read the rubric. And if you need extra time, ask for it!

Session 13 - Monday, 27 November

Before class

  • Read (or at least download and store someplace for later reading!) the economics material from last week
  • Finish instructional unit – if you need more time, ask for it! Don't forget that the assignment includes a reflection

During class

  • Housekeeping
    • Portfolio how-to time at end of class
  • Conceptual work: Social studies and integration
    • Fine arts
      • PDE standards for fine arts and humanities: These are actually some of the finest standards I've seen. VERY thorough, fantastic attention to multiple aspects of the art experience (production, response, analysis), very deep social studies background! Respect.
      • Arts and social studies ed: Great match or perfect match? 
      • Focusing on Haitian art and music
        • Video of field workers singing.
        • Video of rara band from 2005. You might want to skip ahead to the halfway point, since the first part of the video is shot at night, very limited visuals. Awesome music, though. 
        • Two short folksongs (and accompanying discussion) from Mimi Barthelemy
        • De-brief: What did we learn? How was this important? Could we / should we have explored this content through other means? 
    • Groupwork on integration
      • Integrating social studies and fine arts
        • Links
        • Google Doc for arts integration: Put 2 or more ideas here–just a paragraph or so for each that describe the activity that you have in mind, the standards/objectives to be addressed, and links to relevant resources. PUT YOUR NAME ON YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS.
      • Integrating other content areas into social studies
        • Links
          • Brainstorm a lesson using this source material. (If you feel it's too easy or can't think of any ideas, try this version.)
          • Feel free to design something based off of our Weaving the Globe activity (kml file).
          • Pick any lessons from our 'Microteaching Materials' forum in CourseSite
          • Look at any repositories for social studies lesson plans/materials: Curriculum Pathways, for example.
        • Google Doc for integrating other content areas --> SS: Put 2 or more ideas here–just a paragraph or so for each that describe the activity that you have in mind, the standards/objectives to be addressed, and links to relevant resources. PUT YOUR NAME ON YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS.
      • Integrating social studies into other content areas
        • Links
        • Google Doc for integrating SS –> other content areas: Put 2 or more ideas here–just a paragraph or so for each that describe the activity that you have in mind, the standards/objectives to be addressed, and links to relevant resources. PUT YOUR NAME ON YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS.
  • Closure

After class

  • Wrap up any remaining assignments! And if you're missing any re-grades on assignments, hassle me until I get it done!
  • Bring in one thing to share as part of a gallery walk of units in next week (our last class!)
  • Read the following articles 
    • arts integration: Lovorn, 2009
    • cross-curricular integration: Gonzalez et al., 2011



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