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Session 1 - Tuesday, 30 Aug

Before class

  • DO NOT buy a copy of the textbook (Lee, 2008, Visualizing Elementary Social Studies Methods). You'll be getting a free digital copy during the first class session. If you do want to get a paper copy: The library has one on reserve. If you want to own a paper copy: The bookstore has it (I think?); Amazon has it; used copies are fine. 
  • Cruise this wiki and the CourseSite.
  • I have paper copies of the syllabus (well, the second half where all the info about assignments is to be found); you don't have to print out a copy yourself. 

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
    • Introductions
    • Looking at our toolbox: CourseSite, wiki, bookmarks, etc.
    • What is up with the textbook?
      • Guest presenter: Jean Johnson, librarian to the COE
      • Beginning-of-semester survey regarding your background with digital texts & readers.
    • Reviewing syllabus
      • Co-mingling of "old" and "new" programs.
      • Assignments and grading
    • Questions thus far?
  • Conceptual work
    • What is social studies?
      • Jigsaw(-ish) / LGL activity
        • Form SEVEN groups
          • Group A: NCSS materials, publications
          • Group B: PA standards, textbooks; other-content area groups' materials. Use the paper materials plus this link
          • Group C: "Education market" materials
          • Group D: "Heritage market" materials--paper items plus these links: A, B, C.
          • Group E: Re-purposed non-educational materials
          • Group F: Internet links .
          • Group G: Discussion: What do you remember from your elementary social studies experiences? If you can't remember any, feel free to move up to middle level. What topics did you do? What did you read? Watch? Discuss? What sorts of tasks or assessments did you complete?
        • Group work for 10 minutes
        • Report out: Describe what you looked at, what you discussed. Instructor will make a list.
        • Group: Look over the list and create GROUPS of items that seem to be similar.
        • Label: Identify each group by a short (1-4 word) label.
    • What is social studies methods?
      • Content?
      • Techniques?
      • Lesson planning?
    • Notes on the "silent partners" in the class
      • Social studies / methods class and arts integration
      • Methods class and portfolio updating
    • Who am I as a social studies educator? 
  • Closure
    • Review of what's due next week
    • Review of what's where (wiki, CourseSite)
    • Any questions?

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 1 (What is?) & 2 (Reflective) 
    • Crocco, 2004 (as an overview and critique of the field)
    • NCSS, 2008
    • Lovorn, 2009 (as an example of arts integration)
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Update your profile in CourseSite to include your picture
    • Starting planning out your upcoming assignments: Original Instructional Materials product #1, who you'll interview for HTCE, etc. 

Session 2 - Tuesday, 6 Sep

Before class

  • Complete reading: Lee Ch. 1 & 2, NCSS 2008, skim Crocco, 2004, and briefly consider Lovorn, 2009 (as an example of arts integration). 

During class (ppt)

  • Very first thing we're doing: Going outside!! (Actually, we'll be doing a pre-test first, then we'll go outside.) Once outside, we'll be using a variety of technologies to measure some trees and do some calculations. We're having an experience as adult learners, but I was able to do this (in a slowed-down format) with a group of 5th graders at William Penn Elementary. 
    • Once we're back inside: This webpage contains lots of calculators that will help you do the necessary number-crunching; I'll walk you through. (Page credit: Yuanyuan Zhang.)
  • De-briefing our Trees, Cars, and Carbon activity
    • What did we learn? Could you repeat those steps on your own? 
    • What surprised you? Had you used these technologies before, or used them in this way before? 
    • What content area(s) did you work with? Was this 'social studies,' or something else, or a mixture of things? 
    • Think about your intended target learners -- how could/should you adapt this activity to work with these students? 
    • Think about students with learning disabilities or language-learning needs -- how could/should you modify this activity to make it more inclusive and help these students achieve their learning goals? 
    • Overview of the sequence: learning lat-lon & GPS, doing a scaffolded geocache, then doing local inquiry (e.g., sewer survey, Trees-Cars-Carbon)
    • And here are the sources that I worked from. 
  • Conceptual work: Two items for tonight: Ways of organizing social studies education and schema. We'll tackle the latter first
    • Schema
      • What is/are schema (schemata? schemes?)? What do we already know about it? What do we know about the origins of the idea? 
      • Metaphors for schema: Umbrellas, birds' nests, wasps' nests
      • Social studies and schema: What's your schema for latitude and longitude? Look at your pretest; edit/improve each of your answers, based on our activity. How does this show a change in your schema from the beginning of tonight's class? 
    • Ways of organizing social studies
      • Most common: Expanding environments. Students exploring the world; logical progression. 
      • Most 'respected' by adults: Disciplinary. Students behaving like miniature adults, learning what specialists do.
      • De facto curricula
        • 'I do chapter one and then I do chapter two'
        • 'At our school, we do it this way' -- thematic? Integrated? We-teach-holidays?
      • Curricular designs from within the social studies community
        • Research-based: Cultural universals (Brophy & Alleman)
        • Mission-driven: Towards the Common Good (Wade)
      • Your task, as an emerging social studies educator: Sift through, live through these approaches, decide what matters to you. What will you aspire to do? What is critical for your students to know / understand / be able to do? What are you willing to fight for? 
  • Housekeeping
    • Looking at upcoming assignments
      • Discussion of original instructional materials assignment #1 & #2
      • Discussion of curriculum map
    • Any problems with accessing the textbook? Did everyone fill out the survey for the library? If not, here are the instructions for activating and the survey
    • Digital portfolio reminder/clarification: These are required for TLT but not for SpEd (yet). Accordingly: TLT students, you're doing this for 5% of your grade; SpEd students, you're not doing it (but you'll have to do whatever you do on paper to be ready for your end-of-program review...), and you'll be graded out of 95 points, not 100. (I.e., if you earn 95/95, that's 100%; if you earn 85.5/95, that's a 90%, etc.)
    • Arts integration experiences discussion. 
    • Placemarker / activator: Social studies and September 11th. 
  • Closure: Stop and consider: What is in your toolbox of social studies methods now? 
  • We're going to break some additional ground with Google Earth via an activity called Weaving the Globe. To do this, I need to know some info about two items of clothing that you own: a pair of shoes and a shirt. Input your info and I'll show you something cool next week! (Disclosure: This isn't original to me; it's a lesson I first saw in Social Education and then adapted to my own preferences. So: Please consider joining NCSS and subscribing to Social Ed!)

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 3 (Inquiry; connect this to our outside activity) & Ch. 4 (Standards; connect to discussion of frameworks)
    • Re-visit NCSS, 2008 -- do you share these same interests? Could they be achieved via expanding environments? Disciplinary framework?
    • Brophy & Alleman, 2002 (critique of expanding environments & disciplinary; make the case for their own Cultural Universals framework)
    • optional: Wade, 2002 (Towards the Common Good) 
    • skim: Keeler & Langhorst, 2008 (to get ideas for original instructional materials assigns)
  • Assignments 
    • WTL
    • Complete instructional product #1
    • If you didn't already, input your clothing info for next week's activity

Session 3 - Tuesday, 13 Sep

Before class

  • Complete reading -- note that I changed the Keeler & Langhorst link
  • Come to class ready to share instructional product #1!

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
    • Keeler & Langhorst link
    • Clothing survey problems? Anything to discuss there?
    • Tonight's sequence of activities
  • Conceptual work
    • You and your social studies materials
      • Opening example: Dr. H's 'Weaving the Globe' overlay in Google Earth. (BTW, depending on your browser, this may just open up in the browser as a bunch of text. In that case, save the file to your computer, then open it in Google Earth.)
        • Prompts for discussion
      • How to share your materials: Attach to a comment in the WTL forum
      • And now you: Pair and share your materials, follow the prompts for discussion. If you wish, share your materials via the WTL forum.
    • Discussion of planning: standards -> curricula -> units -> lessons -> activities
    • Let's get into the content of social studies: Teaching geography
      • Let's look at standards
        • PDE: there's old...and new. Thoughts? 
          • Things to attend to
            • Mis-match of grade levels.
            • Sequence of understandings...does this add up?
            • Note attention to 'tools' of geography. This is something we can work with, yes?
            • Other concepts (and for whatever reason, this is clearer to me in the old standards: physical vs. human geography, interactions between people and environment. Do we know these concepts? Can we give examples? 
        • Content-area associations: the National Council for Geographic Education has standards: NCGE standards.
        • Other ways of approaching this: NCGE and AAS used to promote the 'Five Themes' of geography -- they aren't 'current', but many, many teachers and materials still follow them.  
        • Back to the mothership: NCSS - they have ten THEMES (other terms they use: standards, strands...sigh) that cut across all fields of social studies. 
        • And how do any of the above relate back to the mission of social studies? (And do you recall what this mission is?)
      • Were the standards helpful? Can they guide instruction? Will this instruction be powerful? Aimed towards the preparation of democratic citizens?
      • In the absence of any other sense of direction, where will teachers turn? The textbook. Let's take a look. 
      • Let's live out a little of this stuff: Let's do some sketchmaps: World, western hemisphere, USA, PA, Lehigh Valley? Iacocca Hall, this classroom? Your neighborhood? Your bedroom?
        • Connections: 
          • Sketchmaps and schema
          • Sketchmaps and the tools of geography. For example: A map should four elements (or sometimes five or even six!)...how many did you include? 
      • And here's the distinction that I'd like to make - meaningless vs. meaningful geography. We'll do by contrasting two activities
        • Naming states (game). There's a million variations of this online.
        • 'What's in a (Place) Name'
        • Contrast these two. The first is unavoidable, but...what schema is being built? What will endure? 
      • Geography as the 'Whys of Where'
      • Re-visit your sketchmap -- add a note that either ASKS 'why is this here? Why is it called this? How does this relate to (some other thing)?' or else ANSWERS a question such as this. 
  • Closure
    • Catching up from last week
      • Discussion of curriculum map, unit plan, and microteaching assignments
      • Discussion of arts integration experiences, expectations
    • Discussion of 9-11 observances, reflections

After class

  • Reading
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Work on original instructional materials assignment, product #2
    • Finalize classroom observation / field work opportunities

Session 4 - Tuesday, 20 Sep

Before class

  • Complete reading, preview video (see above)
  • Work on original instructional material #2
  • Work on upcoming assignments

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Conceptual work
    • Checking in on your toolbox of methods
    • Teaching and learning social studies: Inquiry vs. didactic models
      • Demo lesson: Mapping an orange (Map projections) -- see one version of the plan here.
        • Follow-up #1: Inquiry vs. didactic -- I'm trying to give you a simple, intuitive way to think about selecting social studies methods
          • Discussion of inquiry vs. didactic models of instruction
          • Suggested framework: Giving, prompting, & making (Hammond & Manfra, 2009)
            • In textbook: direct instruction (Ch. 8), active learning / inquiry (Ch. 3, 9, 11)
        • Follow-up #2: More info on maps and globes, starting with projections
          • Mercator map.
          • Peters map.
          • "Dymaxion" map or Fuller map (Buckminster Fuller).
          • Popular contemporary projections include the Winkel Tripel ... it's a more satisfying trade-off between spatial accuracy / distortion and readability.
          • Non-pedagogical application of the issue: Airline route maps--I'll use an NWA map. Note the arc. A little more dramatic version from Cathay Pacific. (More where that came fromairlineroutemaps.com. Who knew such a thing existed??)
        • Static maps & globes -- you can find a wealth of static maps online. Feel free to start here.
        • Dynamic
          • Globes -- Google Earth is of course the kingpin here. See a blog of teaching ideas for using Google Earth.
          • Maps
            • Flickr map. Search for a term in a region. For example, look for "checkpoint" in "Israel" (or pick any other topic that you think students might hear about and need more context on)
              • Groups within Flickr can have their own maps -- I'm partial to the map from theIslam\ group.
            • National Geographic's Map Machine can be used for many activities
            • Google Maps can be customized to do interesting things, especially for projects on your local environment or other places where the geography / spatial relationship is very important. Here is a Google Map I made to plan a trip to Washington, DC. (Not very interesting, sorry -- just demonstrates potential of the tool.)-
            • Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are also powerful tools for using and making dynamic maps.-
      • Now let's focus on human geography, starting with another demo lesson. It's drawn from "What the world eats," and I call it "Families and food"
        • Captions -- match these with the images in the ppt; Countries -- locate these countries on the map. 
        • Family food images taken from TIME magazine photo essay about the book, Hungry Planet. Note the parallel to the book Material World. Both seem like great resources
        • Extensions: 
          • Pop the images onto a map! Someone has done this using Microsoft's Live Maps. I would have done it with Google Maps or as a Google Earth overlay.
          • One of the things I like about this image set is the level of contextualization: We have some info about the family and their location, not just their country. So: Could you locate not just the country but the location (e.g., Tingo, Ecuador)? What resources could you use to do this? 
      •  
    • Teaching geography and world cultures: "Them" is "We"
      • Model lesson: Video study & population density enactive
        • Video via YouTube. They disabled the embeds (Gah!), so just what what I present.
        • Additional visuals (note that plenty more can be found in, among other places, flickr).
        • Enactive -- note that this will require some tweaking for younger learners...more scaffolded math process (or eliminate it altogether). The technique, however (i.e., giving an EXPERIENCE of a topic) is invaluable for all learners, but particularly younger ones.
        • Extension
        • (FYI: The non-YouTube visuals and the enactive are adapted from the Geography Alive! materials from Teachers Curriculum Institute. Amazon link here. If you liked these materials, definitely consider buying this. If you're not sure, ask to borrow my materials. And if you want to watch Geography Alive! in a Live! format, I believe Saucon Valley uses it, or at least some SV teachers do.)
      • "Them" vs. "We"; "Othering" vs. identifying
        • Let's view a clip from a speech by novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie given at Oxford, July 2009. The title is "The danger of a single story" . We'll just watch the first 4:14; then we'll skip ahead to 10:57-11:57 (thank YOU for the interactive transcript!!!)
        • Sample instructional challenges
          • How did the previous activities ("What the World Eats", YouTube clips, population density enactive) reinforce or challenge a Single Story about different cultures / places? 
          • Consider a sample material: Haitian voodoo flag. Poses many possibilities (e.g., combine with writing or math activities), but is also a complex, easily misread artifact. Assuming you had one in your possession, what's one GOOD idea you might have for designing instruction? What's one DANGEROUS line of instruction, one that would lead to "othering" / stereotyping / a Single Story?  
        • Put it into action: Where in children's lit can we find multiple stories / perspectives on cultures? On historical events?
      • Re-visiting your methods toolbox. Can we put our methods to date into some sort of a categorization? Consider the following: 
        • What we've done in class thus far: List-group-label, sketchmaps, looking for patterns in the names on maps, mapping an orange, Weaving the Globe, What the World Eats
        • Take a look at what's in the textbook reading thus far (each lesson concludes with a sample lesson--how would you characterize the methods in each?)
        • What other methods do you know? (E.g., a WebQuest, a simulation or role-playing activity.) How might they fit into your categories?
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, re-visit Ch. 3 (Inquiry), read Ch. 8 (Direct Instruction) & Ch. 12 (Diverse Society)
    • optional: Hammond & Manfra, 2009
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Complete original instructional materials assignment, product #2 (and reflection)
    • Keep working on other assignments: Curriculum map; fieldwork...remember: If you have opportunities to observe, follow them up, but work through Carla Kologie in A-108


Session 5 - Tuesday, 27 Sep

Before class

  • Complete the reading.
  • Complete original instructional material product #2. Don't forget the reflection!

During class (ppt )

  • Housekeeping
    • A little re-arranging tonight in the interest of shortening class....
  • Conceptual work
    • Opening up history ed--let's do an activity using images from the Looking into the Past group on Flickr (group map).
    • Wait -- what does history ed mean in the elementary context, anyway? Let's take a look at some of our sample materials from the good folks at Scott Foresman...
    • What's so hard about history? For now, let's just take a development lens, following Keith Barton's work. 
    • Schema & history ed
    • Pedagogical options, re-framing: trivial / interactive / authentic, doing more methods with images
      • Hide-and-seek within an image. (The image I used came from the Library of Congress' American Memory project--a great source for getting photos PLUS contextual info. Lots of lesson plans, etc.)
      • Slow reveal of an image. (Image source is National Archives and Records Administration, child labor activity. Browse their list of activities, heuristics for working with various primary sources.)
      • Photo analysis (again, image and scaffold are from NARA)
      • Zoom-in / shifting focus. Note that this requires (a) a very high-quality image, such as a TIFF, and (b) an image viewer that will allow you to move around in the image without too much hassle. I got this TIFF out of the Library of Congress – they often give you a choice of formats, from large / high-res (e.g., TIFF) down to more compact, lower-res (e.g., JPG)
    • What was authentic, interactive, or trivial about what we just did?
    • Compare to earlier examples (of assessment, above)
    • Consider earlier demo lessons – are we receiving thick or thin samples of students' schema?
    • Connecting to giving-prompting-making
    • And a peek back into your methods toolbox. BTW, much of tonight's image work could fall into an expanded definition of CONCEPT FORMATION. See a simple definition, see a more extended definition
  • Closure: Tonight's topics and your assignments

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 9, 11, & 13 -- we'll be re-visiting these
    • Schurr, 1992
    • optional: Barton & Levstik, 1996; Barton, 1997
  • Assignments 
    • WTL: Time-shifting the Original Instructional Materials assignment, item #2
      • POST your material to your WTL thread. You don't need to also post the reflection, but do give contextual info on what the product is, how it works. 
      • COMMENT on your partner's product (in their thread)
      • RESPOND to your partner's comment (in your thread)
      • (repeat as needed / desired)
    • Gen Ed students: Get your portfolio updated! Share the URL with me (just do it as a post in your WTL thread)
    • Start thinking about your microteaching presentation
    • Start working on curriculum map
    • Start lining up a participant for your HTCE


Session 6 - Tuesday, 4 Oct

Before class

  • Complete readings
  • Do our 'asynchronous' version of the pair-and-share for original instructional materials assignment #2
  • Gen Ed only: Post one of your original instructional materials assignments to your online portfolio & make sure I can see it!
  • Work on curriculum map
  • Line up a participant for HTCE
  • Start thinking about microteaching

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping – fieldwork update
  • Conceptual work
    • Stopping to reflect on methods
      • Expanding that toolbox: Timelines
    • And a little action on schema: What's your schema about George Washington? Slavery as practiced in the US between 1619 and 1865?
    • History instruction
      • What is it we're talking about when we talk about history? History instruction?
      • Florida standards for grade 4 .
      • Story of Aaron – note that this is drawn from the Geography of Slavery database at the University of Virginia's Center for Digital History.
        • Full set of ads from the Geography of Slavery database at the Virginia Center for Digital History
        • Other ads to explore
        • Other stories to explore
          • Hercules.
          • Oney Judge.
          • William "Billy" Lee.
          • ...and, of course, Sally Hemings.
          • (BTW: These Wikipedia entries have become very, very good over time – I've been using them for several years and the level of background info now offered on slavery and race relations between 1650 and 1950 is pretty amazing – great resource to add some serious context & nuance to teaching this topic, if it's in your syllabus)
      • Closure on teaching history: How was what we just did similar to / different from what you expected? How does it change things (or not) for your students?
      • Closure on schema: How is your schema different about George Washington (et al.)? The institution of slavery? What exactly history is? 
      • Closure on methods toolbox – what did we just add? 
    • Social studies resources
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Read Ch. 5 (History) & Ch. 10 (Literacy)
    • Barton & Levstik, 1996
    • Re-visit NCSS, 2008 – now that we've discussed geography and (part of) history, what does this mean to you? 
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Work on field assignments
    • Work on curriculum map assignment
    • Finalize arrangements for completing your HTCE assignment

Pacing break - Tuesday, 11 Oct -- no class

Session 7 - Tuesday, 18 Oct

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • IF YOU HAVE DONE SOME WORK ON YOUR FIELD ASSIGNMENTS, let me know – turn in the first part of the assignment or at least put in a note to that effect

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping: Talking about assignments
    • Fieldwork: Does everyone have a placement? Are things moving forward? Discussing what's due, when
    • Curriculum map: How is that coming? What resources are useful? (Be sure to cite them!!) Let's take a look at a sample page
    • Microteaching: Sign-ups are available here and in CourseSite
  • Conceptual work: History education as exposure to a discipline, working towards a definition more aligned with citizenship ed
    • First set of questions
    • Three problems to work on
      • What kind of history? Open or closed?
      • What structures can we use that will make sense to teachers and students?
      • What connection can we make to the aims of social studies education (citizenship prep)?
    • Second set of questions
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Fallace, Biscoe, & Perry, 2007
    • Tiemann & Fallace, 2009
    • Optional: I also uploaded more Fallace-related articles, plus some short ones by VanSledright and Barton & Levstik. If you're interested in reading more about the research on history education in elementary, check 'em out!!
  • Assignments
    • Sign up for a microteaching slot; I will post a schedule no later than FRIDAY at NOON.
    • Finish curriculum map & turn it in. I will try to get these back to you ASAP so you can start working on your unit plan outline. 
    • Work on field assignments

Session 8 - Tuesday, 25 Oct

Before class

  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
    • Curriculum map questions? Problems? 
    • eTextbook survey – we have only seven responses!!
  • Microteaching – tonight's awesome classmates who are going first (hooray! You're the best!) are...
    • Rachel U.
    • Alicia F.
    • Sandy C.
  • Conceptual work
    • Wrapping up history
      • Checking our Statue of Liberty responses. In the process, we will be looking into Wikipedia's entry in English (and Simple English, since the full article is overwhelming) and its entry in French. (Any help? Anyone read French better than I? Pretty please?). To discern the motives, it helps to focus on the originator of the idea (Edouard Rene de Laboulaye) and not the sculptor (Auguste Bartholdi). And the prize goes to...
      • History three ways: National narrative, disciplinary inquiry, civic activity, focusing on the American Revolution. Our materials:
        • A script about the Boston Massacre, from Scholastic.
        • A set of primary and secondary resources about Lexington and Concord from the Historical Scene Investigations people at William and Mary. 
        • Activities centering around local connections to the Revolutionary War
          • Events: Concealing the Liberty Bell at Zion Reformed German Church (now Zion Reformed United Church of Christ) in Northampton Town (now Allentown) -- what happened? Why? Construct a Google Earth overlay to summarize. How has it been remembered? Visit Liberty Bell Shrine and Museum
          • People: How did the Moravian community respond to the Revolution? Who was William Allen and why was he a Loyalist? Write a thumbnail biography a selected person. 
          • Places: What was agriculture like then at the Burnside Plantation? What did Moravian College look like? What was going on in the Brethren's House? (Somewhat out of the time period, but a beautiful object of puzzlement: map of the farms on the Southside of Bethlehem, 1798.)
      • Closing comment on history.
    • Opening up civics
      • Let's start with some split-half brainstorming:
        • What is a citizen? What should a citizen know, understand, and be able to do? Record your answers in this Google Doc. (No sign-in required, just start writing)
        • Who is a citizen? What are the implications of this decision? Record your answers in this Google Doc. (Again, no sign-in required, just write)
      • Turning to the social studies literature
        • Standards: PDE, Center for Civic Education
        • Lee (textbook author): Civic competence and civic awareness
        • R. Freeman Butts: Knowledge, skills, and dispositions
        • Westheimer & Kahne: What Kind of Citizen?
      • Your challenge for next week (to be done in WTL): Pick a lesson topic connecting to Constitution Day and (briefly) design it TWO ways among the four identified by Westheimer and Kahne. 
      • Time permitting: A single civics topic two ways: Branches of government via graphics–iconic or real? 
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 7 (Civics)
    • Westheimer & Kahne, 2004
    • Constitution Day and Citizenship Day links
    • Optional: USCIS, 2007 & 2011; Westheimer, 2009
  • Assignments
    • WTL – see specification about briefly sketching out TWO civics lessons with different underlying premises about what kind of citizen (knowledgeable, responsible, participatory, social justice-oriented)

    • Complete unit plan outline. I will try to have your curriculum maps back to you ASAP so you have some feedback going into this. 
    • If you are in general ed and haven't already: Update your online portfolio. 

Session 9 - Tuesday, 1 Nov – No class; SNO-POCALYPSE!!!!

Before class

  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • MicroteachingConceptual work
    • Kelsi
    • Heidi
    • Kealan
    • Katie H.
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
  • Assignments

Session 10 - Tuesday, 8 Nov

Before class

  • Complete reading

During class

  • Housekeeping
  • Microteaching
  • Conceptual work–just a little bit more on teaching civics; sorry no ppt. The focus is the distance between civic FORMS and civic PROCESSES
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Vorhaus, 2005
    • Naiarian, 2011
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Micro-teaching prep/reflection as needed
    • Complete your HTCE (if you haven't already)
    • Work on unit plan

Session 11 - Tuesday, 15 Nov

Before class

  • Complete reading
  • Complete and turn in your HTCE
  • Work on unit plan
  • Prep / follow-up on microteaching as needed. 

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Microteaching
    • Carly B.
    • Alex Z.
    • Mel McB.
  • Conceptual work: Instructional planning, with attention to unit plans, and a little more attention to diversity
    • Reading people's unit outlines
      • Comment on standards
        • PDE 2002 v. 2009
        • "NSS" (from here?) vs. NCHS (which is the original, authoritative source)
      • Unit (and lesson) objectives
      • The role of an essential question / discussion of Backwards Design & Understanding by Design. See Lane-Kelso, 2001 for more. 
    • Looking at the required lesson plan elements–how you arrange them is up to you
    • Discussion of differentiation / adaptation / accommodation. What methods do you have at your disposal?
      • In the context of your unit plan: Special needs scenarios for microteaching.
    • Diversity and social studies education, second pass
      • Rights and privileges / citizenship and groups / earned and unearned affiliation.
      • Classroom community
        • Students with learning needs (e.g., learning disability, emotional/behavioral disability, impaired I/O, language learning needs)
        • Students with social needs (member of a vulnerable group)
        • Everyone: Awareness, respect, nuturing
    • And again: Citizenship is a big deal. Dealing with differences is probably the most fundamental underlying construct across history, human geography, moral questions about economics – everything. 
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Lee, Ch. 12
    • Dee, 2011
    • optional: Lane-Kelso, 2001
  • Assignments

Session 12 - Tuesday, 22 Nov

Before class

  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Microteaching
    • Kealan
    • Leigh Ann
    • Jenn S. 
    • Andy M.
  • Conceptual work
    • Economics in elementary ed
    • Economics against the backdrop of American culture and economy.
    • Some thoughts about social studies and history, keying on Thanksgiving
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • VanFossen, 2003
    • Day, 2006
    • optional: Day, 1988
  • Assignments
    • WTL
    • Work on unit. Keep in mind the opportunity to turn in your unit materials for early feedback (Fri, Dec 2)
    • Work on field assignments

Session 13 - Tuesday, 29 Nov

Before classe

  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Microteaching
    • Will Z.
    • Courtney D.
    • Erin T.
    • special guest microteacher: Brian S.
  • Conceptual work: Social studies and integration
    • Fine arts
      • Arts integration requirements, paperwork – see links in CourseSite
      • PDE standards for fine arts and humanities: These are actually some of the finest standards I've seen. VERY thorough, fantastic attention to multiple aspects of the art experience (production, response, analysis), very deep social studies background! Respect.
      • Arts and social studies ed: Great match or perfect match? 
      • Focusing on Haitian art and music
        • Video of field workers singing.
        • Video of rara band from 2005. You might want to skip ahead to the halfway point, since the first part of the video is shot at night, very limited visuals. Awesome music, though. 
        • Two short folksongs (and accompanying discussion) from Mimi Barthelemy
        • De-brief: What did we learn? How was this important? Could we / should we have explored this content through other means? 
    • Groupwork on integration
      • Integrating social studies and fine arts
        • Links
        • Google Doc for arts integration: Put 2 or more ideas here–just a paragraph or so for each that describe the activity that you have in mind, the standards/objectives to be addressed, and links to relevant resources. PUT YOUR NAME ON YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS.
      • Integrating other content areas into social studies
        • Links
          • Brainstorm a lesson using this source material. (If you feel it's too easy or can't think of any ideas, try this version.)
          • Feel free to design something based off of our Weaving the Globe activity (kml file).
          • Pick any lessons from our 'Microteaching Materials' forum in CourseSite
          • Take a look at what PDE provides in its portal. For example, click on the link for 'Social Studies videos' from the Instruction page. You can also try looking in the 'Materials and Resources' section of the portal, but from what I've seen, there's not much there....
          • Look at any other repositories for social studies lesson plans/materials: Gateway to 21st Century Skills, Thinkfinity, SASPathways, etc.
        • Google Doc for integrating other content areas --> SS: Put 2 or more ideas here–just a paragraph or so for each that describe the activity that you have in mind, the standards/objectives to be addressed, and links to relevant resources. PUT YOUR NAME ON YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS.
      • Integrating social studies into other content areas
        • Links
          • Adapt this lesson plan.
          • Instructional materials available from the PDE/SAS portal
            • Videos linked from the 'Instruction' page
            • A smorgasbord of items linked from the 'Materials and Resources' part of the portal. I've linked you to the 'Advanced Search' page within this section – specify a grade level and content area, see what you get for math / science / ELA / etc.
          • Select any activity from this page of the NLVM and adapt it.
          • (etc.)
        • Google Doc for integrating SS –> other content areas: Put 2 or more ideas here–just a paragraph or so for each that describe the activity that you have in mind, the standards/objectives to be addressed, and links to relevant resources. PUT YOUR NAME ON YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS.
  • Closure

After class

  • Reading
    • Lovorn, 2009
    • Au, 2009
  • Assignments
    • WTL (or just finish up your arts integration posts, if you haven't done this already)
    • Microteaching prep or reflection
    • Work on unit – are you planning on taking advantage of the early submit / feedback / revision opportunity? Deadline is Friday, Dec 2
    • Work on fieldwork assignments
 

Session 14 - Tuesday, 6 Dec

Before class

  • Complete reading

During class (ppt)

  • Housekeeping
  • Microteaching
    • Avery
    • Candice
    • Jason P. 
    • Dane
  • Conceptual work: Technology, social studies, and the future of everything
    • 5-picture Charades 
      • First, let's look at Tableau
      • How do you play Charades?
      • Charades with digital cameras = 5-picture charades
      • Viewing your pictures: Click on a link; it will take you to a folder.
      • Guess the story!
      • De-brief and discuss how this might be used with younger students, students with special needs, etc.
    • Digital movie-making activity.
      • Recover your pictures -- Use the links above to locate your group's pictures. Right-click on the files in the folder to save them to your local computer.
      • Make your movie: I will be using Movie Maker; you may use iMovie
      • For those who had me for TLT 406: You get to use PrimaryAccess and make a movie about Lehigh.
        • PrimaryAccess.org
        • Click on "Make movies" or the picture
        • Log in with tlt412a/tlt412a; tlt412b/tlt412b (etc.)
        • Make a movie!
  • Closure – do your course evaluation and feel free to add any additional anonymous feedback that you think of later

After class

  • Reading: Skim final chapter of Lee
  • Assignments–finish up! Final items due Dec 13; ask for an extension if you need it.
  • Don't forget to submit your course evaluation, and remember that I have my own anonymous feedback option that you can exercise at any point. 

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